Appeal challenges Alaska’s exclusion of village residents from juries

first_imgAt the center of the dispute is an appeal by Teddy Kyle Smith, 50, who was convicted of attempted murder and sentenced to 99 years in prison for shooting two men near his home village of Kiana in 2012.Smith’s trial was in Kotzebue, the closest courthouse to Kiana but still more than 50 miles away. In general, Alaska jurors are only assigned to criminal trials from communities within 50 miles of the courthouse where the trial is held.Smith’s lawyers say he was not tried by a jury of his peers, because the trial judge denied their request to expand the jury pool.Smith’s attorney for the appeal, Kelly Taylor, was in court Thursday in Anchorage and argued that decision infringed on villagers’ rights as well.“This court will have to decide whether the right to participate in jury service of village residents is violated by their categorical exclusion from the jury panel in this case, and whether Smith’s right to a fair cross-section was violated, where the people who share his experience of living day to day in a remote village location was violated,” Taylor said.Taylor and others, including the American Civil Liberties Union and Native American Rights Fund, say there is also a racial inequity component to jury selection in Alaska, because villages tend to have a higher proportion of Alaska Native residents.“Alaska Natives are underrepresented on juries and it means that non-Native residents are over-represented on juries,” Taylor said. “Being on a jury means applying the law. Your vote is an application of the law, and that discrepancy means Alaska Native residents get fewer votes.”Among other claims, Smith’s lawyers say villagers would have better understood his comments when he said he thought he was shooting at enukin: a name for the “little people” of some Alaska Native legends.But state attorney Ann Black argued that legend is also shared by people who live outside of villages, including some Kotzebue residents. Likewise, Black and the state court system say jurors from Kotzebue are not so different from residents of villages as to be unfair to a defendant.The state also says the cost of getting jurors to a courthouse more than 50 miles from where they live presents a logistical and financial burden for the court system.In court Thursday, Black argued that selection of jurors in Smith’s case was fair according to a past decision by the Alaska Supreme Court.“The Supreme Court recognized mile radiuses need to be drawn. It’s going to happen,” Black said. “And so long as those lines are drawn in a manner that does not deny a defendant a fair cross-section of the community on his jury venire, then they’re constitutionally sound.”A three-judge appellate court panel heard both sides’ arguments. It’s unclear when they will hand down a decision. Crime & Courts | NorthwestAppeal challenges Alaska’s exclusion of village residents from juriesMay 24, 2018 by Casey Grove, Alaska Public Media Share:The jury box in a Dimond Courthouse courtroom in Juneau on Oct. 5, 2017. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)The Alaska Court of Appeals heard arguments Thursday in a case that could have huge implications for how Alaska village residents are included — or excluded — as jurors in trials. Share this story:last_img read more

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Former Dunleavy budget director Donna Arduin returns to train legislative candidates

first_imgEconomy | Politics | State GovernmentFormer Dunleavy budget director Donna Arduin returns to train legislative candidatesSeptember 30, 2020 by James Brooks, Anchorage Daily News Share:Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s Office of Management and Budget Director Donna Arduin, center, watches as protesters hijacked the second day of the legislative special session at Wasilla Middle School on Wednesday, July 10, 2019. (Bill Roth / ADN)Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s controversial first budget director, Donna Arduin, returned to Alaska this month to help lead a two-day budget seminar for legislative candidates and new lawmakers.Hosted by three conservative groups, the seminar attracted 36 Republican and Libertarian legislators and candidates, organizers said. With a third of the Alaska Legislature on hand, some attendees said it was the largest gathering of lawmakers and prospective lawmakers they had seen this election season.Sen. Bill Wielechowski of Anchorage was the lone Democratic lawmaker to attend any of the event.“My guess is they’re laying the groundwork for what they want to do, or at least what a portion of the people want to do,” he said.Alaska is projecting a budget deficit of at least $2 billion if legislators and the governor approve a traditional Permanent Fund dividend, but with the state’s Constitutional Budget Reserve effectively empty, it will be difficult to pay that dividend without other major changes.In a series of talks, Arduin and others spoke about the options available to the Legislature. Some of those options, such as diverting local petroleum property taxes, spending from the account that subsidizes rural electricity, or spending additional money from the Alaska Permanent Fund, have previously been discarded by the Legislature.Her talks weren’t a recipe for next session, Arduin said. “It was intended to be nonpartisan and an education,” she said.She spoke only as a consultant and not as an advocate of any particular option, she said.David Boyle, another speaker, said he was trying to both inform and advocate. “It was probably correct to say I was doing both,” he said.Arduin still popular among conservativesThe seminar took place Sept. 12-13 at the Sunrise Grill in Palmer and was sponsored by three conservative groups: Alaska Roundtable, Alaska Politics Explained, and United For Liberty.Libertarian activist Michael Chambers founded United For Liberty. He picked Palmer in part because it was beyond the bounds of Anchorage’s public health restrictions. Boyle is behind Alaska Politics Explained, and Ric Davidge is the founder of Alaska Roundtable. Boyle said both of their groups had a more supportive role.Chambers has been urging candidates to promise that they will support a $3,000 Permanent Fund dividend in 2021, plus retroactive payments. Dozens have signed that promise, and many appeared at the seminar, paying $75 apiece to offset the cost of renting the space and flying Arduin to Alaska from her home in northern Michigan.“She presented four or five times in a two-day period. I designed it around her — obviously, you don’t get Donna Arduin all the time,” Chambers said.Dunleavy hired Arduin in Nov. 2018 to serve as director of the Office of Management and Budget. After the governor proposed balancing the budget with vast budget cuts and tax revenue diverted by local governments, she became a focal point for opponents of the governor’s plan.Many Alaska conservatives loved her ideas and continued to embrace her as a symbol, even after the governor dismissed her in late 2019. Some Republicans sought her endorsement in the August primary and she has stayed in contact with Chambers, who considers her a friend and invited her to talk.“We want to give them the tools to let them know there’s multiple options out there,” she said of the lawmakers and candidates at the event.Networking before next sessionSen. David Wilson, R-Wasilla, paid $75 to attend but found himself invited to talk about health care. For the past two years, he’s been chairman of the Senate Health and Social Services Committee and a member of the Senate Finance Committee.“It was just talking about what changes need to be made to our Medicaid system,” he said, explaining that some Medicaid services Alaska provides are considered optional in other states. Last year, the Dunleavy administration attempted to end optional dental services as a cost-cutting move, then reversed itself after running into federal regulations and public opposition.He and others said they were interested in networking. Seven Republican incumbents lost their primary election races in August, and four other incumbents are not running for re-election.While all the primary winners must also win the Nov. 3 general election to be seated, many are in Republican-leaning districts that are almost certain to elect a Republican.“It was an opportunity to maybe build some bridges,” said Wielechowski, who spoke for an hour about his unsuccessful lawsuit about the Permanent Fund dividend formula.“There were a lot of people there — like a third of the Legislature — and there’s a good chance they’re going to be in power next year, at least some of them,” he said.Among those attending: Robert Myers, who defeated Sen. John Coghill, R-North Pole; Roger Holland (defeated Sen. Cathy Giessel, R-Anchorage); James Kaufman (defeated Rep. Jennifer Johnston, R-Anchorage); Christopher Kurka (defeated Lynn Gattis in the race to replace Rep. Colleen Sullivan-Leonard, R-Wasilla); Kevin McCabe (defeated Rep. Mark Neuman, R-Big Lake); and Ron Gillham, one of two Republicans vying to replace Rep. Gary Knopp, R-Kenai.Education, health care and dividendsMyers said his biggest takeaway from the event was that “for the last 40 years, we’ve just thrown money at a lot of problems, and we’ve required very little accountability.”Boyle was “particularly concerned with the education budget and how we’re spending so much on education and getting so little out of it,” Myers said.K-12 education spending is the largest piece of the state budget when considering state tax-funded spending. (If federal spending is included, it’s No. 2, behind health care.)In a talk radio interview after the seminar, Arduin said she doesn’t like to use the word “cuts,” instead preferring to talk about “reform.”“Instead of saying we’re going to cut education, we’re going to say, ‘Our kids are going to learn to read.’ Let’s start with that proposition,” she said.Most policy changes can’t be done in a year, leaving this year’s deficit as a problem.“If you’re going to rewrite K-12 or Medicaid, you’re just going to need time. Even with the university … it takes them a year to make any changes,” she said by phone.The state’s principal savings account, the Constitutional Budget Reserve, will be effectively empty by June 2021.On talk radio, she said Alaskans shouldn’t see that as a recipe for doom and gloom. Lawmakers can use the Permanent Fund’s earnings reserve and other reserved funds to make ends meet while they make cuts.The state has almost $2 billion available in accounts reserved for things like the state’s Power Cost Equalization program — which subsidizes rural electrical prices — plus the accounts of state corporations like the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority and the Alaska Railroad.“There’s money available for a glidepath,” she said.Similar ideas were proposed in Dunleavy’s first year but never implemented.Ed King, the state’s chief economist under Arduin, is an independent candidate for state House in Juneau and spoke at the event after paying his own way.While Arduin is staunchly anti-tax, King isn’t, and he told attendees that fixing the state’s deficit through cuts alone isn’t possible.“Anybody who thinks they can get out of this without changes to the PFD and some new taxes is crazy,” he said.“For me, it’s not a party thing, it’s not a conservative vs. liberal kind of thing. It’s a reality-check kind of thing,” he said.This story was originally published by the Anchorage Daily News and is republished here with permission. Share this story:last_img read more

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Object Permanence: Dinah Lenney on the Power of Things

first_imgBooksUncategorizedObject Permanence: Dinah Lenney on the Power of ThingsPlus: Your chance to win one of five signed copies of her new bookBy Marielle Wakim – June 24, 2014619ShareEmailFacebookTwitterPinterestReddItAuthor Dinah Lenney“Certain objects,” Dinah Lenney writes, “not always the ones we’d expect to keep or remember or dream about, insinuate themselves—take on a lustre in which we are reflected.” It’s quite the thought to ponder: why do we hold on to certain items, trinkets, doodads, and dispose of others? How have those objects shaped who we are or who we will become? In The Object Parade, Lenney’s new collection of essays, the Echo Park-based author, actress, and teacher (my former thesis advisor, in fact) considered these questions and more, artfully stringing together various memories from her life as told through the things within it. Read our interview with Lenney below, and enter to win one of five signed copies of The Object Parade here. The Object Parade is a departure from your last memoir, Bigger than Life, about the murder of your father. Was this book in any way a continuation of the catharsis regarding his death? Or do you view the two as separate entities with separate purposes?I think (I hope) that the books are very different. And that they have separate purposes, yes—see, if the catalyst for Bigger than Life was my father’s murder, it turned out to be much about other things. About grief, of course. But because my parents split up and remarried when I was a toddler (and I have no siblings from the first marriage) I was grieving alone—so the book was necessarily about that dynamic. In that sense it was a book I was always going to write; I’d been writing around it for years—that is, I needed to figure out where I belonged and to whom. As much as anything, BTL is a story about coming to terms with divorce. And with a kind of survivor’s guilt, since I meant to honor a relationship (a few, in fact) that had been difficult and confusing.The parade, though, is short on trauma, and the tone of the book is lighter (I think, I hope). But because it’s also much about family, and about what’s happened since the murder, I guess it is a sort of extension. Not meant to be a sequel, but I definitely had to write the other book first. You know what else? It was hard to figure out how to include my father in the parade. I mean, how not to give him a chapter, right? His life and death continue to have everything to do with mine. But I couldn’t let him steal the show. Because the message of the book (I hope) is that we carry on.Two quotes appear at the beginning of the book that read as follows:I am giving you this because I love you. Or because it was given to me. Because I bought it somewhere special. Because you will care for it. Because it will complicate your life. —Edmund de Waal, The Hare with the Amber EyesThe object…has no duty whatsoever toward me, it is I who am obliged to it. —Francis Ponge, Mute Objects of AffectionBoth ascribe a certain power to inanimate objects. I’m curious, did you come up with the concept for the book and then find the quotes, or was it the opposite that inspired the structure? What was it that inspired you to write the collection at all?Well, you know how it is: when you’re working on something, when you’re obsessed, you keep bumping into whatever it is—or I do, anyway. So the quotes didn’t spark the idea, no. But once I knew what I was doing, I started collecting them. As if for good luck—or affirmation, or whatever—and they kind of spurred me on. You can’t believe how many there were! I even included another as an epigraph—part of a poem by Kay Ryan called Blue China Doorknob—but my editor thought three were a bit much. And, as usual, he was right. However, the original inspiration? It was an Object Parade! A bunch of third and fourth graders dressed up as life-sized objects—my son was the turquoise walkie-talkie—so that’s what gave me the idea.What was the hardest part of pulling this book together?The book is a collection of discrete essays, so the challenge was thinking about it as a book. And then coming up with the right chronology so that it hung together as a whole—as greater than the sum of its parts.Were you ever concerned that the memories you associate with these objects might offend those who had given them to you or who were part of the memories themselves? Did the thought affect your writing at all?Absolutely, I was. But then I’d get excited about the writing and forget to worry. I did go back and tweak here and there—my agenda is not to blame, or hurt, or cast aspersions. But what I find is that I can’t always anticipate who will be offended and why. So much of my worrying turns out to be a waste of time.As a professor of memoir and essay, what is one thing you teach your students that you struggle to do with your own work?I remind them that if we knew all the answers—what things mean to us and how they stack up—we wouldn’t have to write in the first place. This kind of writing, it’s all about questions. And self-interrogation. And wanting to figure things out. That’s what drives it—that’s what makes it interesting for writers and readers both—and that’s what gives the prose a pulse.Why was it important for you to publish this collection? To tell these stories?Not that I knew until I was finished, but I needed to come to terms with who and where I am (as a wife, mother, actor, writer, registered-voter-in-Los-Angeles) and how I got from then to now, there to here.Tell us the story of one object that didn’t make it into the book.Boy, there are at least a dozen. But okay: I have this beautiful pencil jar—big and shapely and painted with vines and flowers—which used to be a mug until it lost its handle. I bought it in San Francisco 15 years ago when I went up there to do a play for a couple of months. Even though I lived in Echo Park. Even though I had two little kids and two dogs and a lovely husband. It was such a good role—such a wonderful chance. The upshot—how to say this?—I put myself and my career ahead of my family. I mean, I trusted that we were solid enough, Fred and I, to make it work. And we were. And we did. But that role and that play—it seemed so important at the time. And I think it was, for all kinds of reasons, although not necessarily the ones I had in mind. Just like writing, right? Just like life. Enter here to win one of five signed copies of The Object Parade   TAGSL.A CulturePrevious articleGrand Central Market Is Now Open for DinnerNext articleBread Winners: Rustic Canyon Hosts Dinner with Tartine Bakery’s Chad RobertsonMarielle Wakim RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORThe Holiday Season Officially Starts with These L.A. Tree Lighting EventsGorgeous Hotel Pools in L.A. Where You Can Cool Off Without Booking a RoomWhy You Should be Listening to Mexican-Born, L.A.-Based Rapper Niña Diozlast_img read more

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Rattlesnake seen slithering around Babcock Ranch neighborhood

first_imgAdvertisement FWC officials share tips to stay safe during snakebite season April 9, 2021 AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Big snake spotted slithering across Corkscrew road November 14, 2020 AdvertisementEastern diamondback rattlesnakes live in areas that have palmetto thickets including pine flatwoods, sand pine scrub, and longleaf pine and turkey oak habitats, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission website. Health Matters: The Pros and Cons to Virtual Training November 15, 2020 PUNTA GORDA, Fla. — Need another reason to stay home during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic? This video might convince you.A woman said she found a rattlesnake slithering around her neighborhood in Charlotte County. The video was taken in the Trails Edge Neighborhood in Babcock Ranch.Rattlesnakes are venomous and native to Florida. One of the most popular and venomous rattlesnakes found in Florida is the eastern diamondback.center_img RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments State Road 31 could soon get a much-needed upgrade March 15, 2021 AdvertisementTags: babcock ranchRattlesnake Advertisementlast_img read more

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A political convention like no other as Fine Gael candidates make their case

first_imgHome News A political convention like no other as Fine Gael candidates make their… NewsPolitics Council By Steven Miller – 22nd March 2021 Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival In normal times the Fine Gael delegates from around the county would have gathered in a hotel function room or a community hall.There would have been excited hand-shaking and back-slapping, queues to register to vote, a nervous tension in the air and possibly even tea and biscuits.But instead the party’s convention to select a candidate to replace the retired Tom Mulhall in the Graiguecullen-Portarlington Municipal District on Laois County Council was held this evening on Zoom.As with everything this past year, this was different. For a start it was over and done with in about an hour. But there was also a slightly surreal feel to it. Midlands North West MEP Maria Walsh was the special guest, joining from her office in Brussels. Fine Gael regional organiser Laura Comiskey was in Leitrim.Chaired by the good-humoured John Martin from Banagher in Offaly, there was over 40 delegates in attendance, including Deputy Charlie Flanagan, Laois County Councillors Mary Sweeney, Thomasina Connell, Conor Bergin and John King and their Offaly colleague John Clendennen.There was also a couple of former councillors – James Deegan from Stradbally and Percy Clendennen across the border in Kinnity.But the meeting was essentially about three people – the outgoing councillor Tom Mulhall, who retired on health grounds earlier this year after 12 years in the role; and the two contenders to fill the vacancy, PJ Kelly from Belgrove near Ballybrittas and Vivienne Phelan from Stradbally.The well wishes flowed in to Tom Mulhall from all speakers; PJ Kelly saying he had “never known a person so passionate about politics”. Pinterest Previous articleFrom the LaoisToday Archives: Laois County Council and Supermacs owner strike deal for land in PortlaoiseNext articleJOB VACANCY: HFS Accountants in Mountrath seeking to hire Tax Manager Steven Millerhttp://www.laoistoday.ieSteven Miller is owner and managing editor of LaoisToday.ie. From Laois, Steven studied Journalism in DCU and has 14 years experience in the media, almost 10 of those in an editorial role. Husband of Emily, father of William and Lillian, he’s happiest when he’s telling stories or kicking a point. Facebook “It didn’t matter what party you were. Tom would help you if he could,” he added. “His vote increased by hundreds on each occasion and it was said he was so popular he wouldn’t have to canvass at all the next time.”“He is a huge loss to Laois County Council,” added Vivienne Phelan. “He covered this area from the very tip of Portarlington to Graiguecullen bridge. Everything from small issues to big concerns, Tom was always there for all parties and none.”“I’d like to acknowledge the importance of this occasion to Tom Mulhall and his family,” added Deputy Charlie Flanagan. “I’m delighted to see Tom in such good fettle and I wish you well in your recovery and your retirement.”Cllr Mary Sweeney praised Tom’s “incredible work ethic”; Cllr Conor Bergin joked that when he worked in Charlie Flanagan’s office, “a week wouldn’t pass by without Tom bringing in work for us”. “Hopefully we will have a chance in due course to mark all the work you have done.”Cllr Thomasina Connell said she missed Tom hugely from the council chamber and he was “a huge educator to me when I entered the council”. Cllr John Clendennen noted the “high esteem that Tom was held in across the constituency”.And among the first to speak was Tom from his home in Cappakeel near Emo.Though he suffered a stroke last summer which eventually forced his retirement earlier this year, his good humour and wit was palpable even through the computer screen.His role on this occasion was to propose PJ Kelly as his replacement. From nearby Belgrove, Kelly has been a long-standing ally and three-time Director of Elections for Tom Mulhall when he was successful in 2009, 2014 and 2019.“PJ will be very good for this job,” said Tom. “You couldn’t have a better candidate. I’d be hoping PJ goes on to get this position as I know he’ll work very hard for the people.”Brian Nolan then seconded PJ Kelly, saying he was a local party activist all his life and heavily involved in the Courtwood GAA club where he is the current treasurer, a former chairman and a long-serving player, though he noted that his days might be numbered in that capacity as “he can’t be putting in hard challenges on prospective voters”.Nominating Vivienne Phelan was her Young Fine Gael colleague Niamh Bakker from Stradbally, who referenced Phelan’s 2019 Local Election campaign when she got over 500 first preference votes.“I believe she has learned a lot from that experience,” said Bakker. “She is well connected with voters and she has a vision for what she wants to achieve.”It was then the turn of the candidates to address the meeting with Kelly mentioning his long association with the party, his work at church gate collections and elections and how he will “avail of all the experience of Tom Mulhall” if he was the one chosen by the party.He also noted that while he was nominated by his own Ballybrittas-Emo-Vicarstown branch, he also received a nomination from the Killeen branch, the base of Cllr Aisling Moran, the party’s other sitting councillor in the district.“We will work well together for Fine Gael,” he added.Vivienne Phelan spoke of her involvement with the party at college, branch, constituency and national level.She too spoke of how much she learned from 2019 election bid and the benefit of “meeting constituents of all ages and backgrounds during that campaign”.“I want to help make this area a great place to live, work and do business.”Party members in the district will now be posted ballot papers in the coming days which must be returned by April 10. Somewhere between 70 and 80 members are entitled to vote.The count will take place in Fine Gael HQ on April 11 with the result announced that day.The successful candidate will then be officially co-opted to Laois County Council at the monthly meeting on Monday, April 26.SEE ALSO – Talking Sport Podcast: Leo Turley on Laois memories, management and Laois Gaels WhatsApp A political convention like no other as Fine Gael candidates make their case RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img WhatsApp Electric Picnic Twitter Pinterest Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date Electric Picnic Facebook Twitter TAGSFine GaelGraiguecullen Portarlington Municipal DistrictLaois County CouncilPJ KellyTom MulhallVivienne Phelan Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 monthslast_img read more

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Invesco launches new Series P funds

first_img Purpose looks to fill retirement income gap with longevity fund IE Staff Share this article and your comments with peers on social media IG Wealth amends product shelf Toronto-based Invesco Canada Ltd. launched several funds on Friday to enhance its Invesco Private Wealth program. The program provides preferred pricing to affluent investors who work with a financial advisor, through Invesco Canada’s Private Investor series (Series P). Investors who choose a fee-based account may access the program through Series PF. Series P and Series PF are reserved exclusively for investors with at least $100,000 in household assets invested in Invesco Canada funds. This threshold is within reach for many families as investors may link their personal accounts with those held by their spouse or family members residing at the same address. The new funds available through the program include: • Invesco Canadian Balanced Fund • Invesco European Growth Class • Trimark Global Balanced Fund • Trimark Global Endeavour Fund • Trimark Income Growth Fund • Trimark Select Balanced Fund As well, Invesco announced that the Trimark Global Balanced Class Fund is now available in Series PF4 and PF6, which combine the benefits of fee-based accounts with Invesco Private Wealth and Invesco Canada’s T-FLEX series, which delivers a tax-efficient income stream. Additionally, Trimark Global Balanced Class and Trimark Global Dividend Class are both now available in Series F4 and F6. Both series provide investors in fee-based accounts with access to Invesco Canada’s T-FLEX series. Finally, Invesco Canada now offers U.S.-dollar purchase options for the following Series P and Series PF funds: • Invesco International Growth Class • Trimark Global Balanced Fund • Trimark Global Balanced Class • Trimark Global Endeavour Fund • Trimark Global Endeavour Class • Trimark Global Fundamental Equity Class • Trimark U.S. Companies Class With today’s additions, Invesco Private Wealth now includes 41 actively managed mutual funds, delivered through 104 separate series.center_img Franklin Templeton launches new real asset fund Related news Keywords Mutual fundsCompanies Invesco Canada Ltd. Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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New tool being developed to measure effectiveness of financial literacy programs

first_img Tessie Sanci “We know there’s a need [for financial literacy] and there’s a lot of effort being made, but do we have the capacity to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs? That’s what we want to put in place,” Campbell said. “Those tools don’t really exist right now.” The research for this project has just begun and is meant to be publicly available in a little more than a year. It will be accessible to public, private and community-based organizations. Financial advisors will also be able to make use of the resources being developed. A database of metrics is being developed to provide evidence-based outcomes and indicators of a successful financial literacy program against which other programs could be compared. The CBA will fund the initiative and Prosper Canada, a non-profit organization that promotes financial literacy, will lead the research and development of this system. The building of this database will involve studying literature on the topic from around the world to identify the factors involved in establishing a successful program. “The reason we have engaged [with] Prosper is because this is its particular area of expertise and [Prosper] can bring [its] expertise and then develop metrics [for the project],” Campbell said. Representatives from all three parties will form an advisory committee to review findings and provide feedback. An online toolkit will also be created to help those who run financial literacy programs tweak those programs in order to improve them, according to Campbell. “We’re quite excited about this,” he said. “Financial literacy is near and dear to the banking industry. We believe in it very strongly.” The CBA’s partners also lauded the initiative. “Financial literacy is a shared responsibility and that’s why it is so critical to be part of this collaborative effort with the CBA and Prosper Canada,” says Jane Rooney, Canada’s financial literacy leader, in a statement. (Rooney has been charged with implementing the federal government’s financial literacy strategy.) “This project is the next important step in our ongoing work to build a shared menu of rigorous metrics for financial literacy work in Canada,” adds Elizabeth Mulholland, CEO of Prosper Canada, in a statement: “This will make it easier for community financial educators, as well as others, to evaluate their programs.” The ongoing emphasis on increasing Canadians’ financial literacy has resulted in Prosper Canada engaging in various partnerships with financial servicse institutions. The non-profit announced on Wednesday it is beginning a financial coaching pilot project with Toronto-based Capital One Canada that will examine the efficacy of integrating financial coaching into existing social services. Prosper Canada also embarked on a separate pilot project earlier this year that connects low-income clients in Toronto to financial advisors that act as financial coaches. A consortium of investment firms is funding this project. How to connect with your clients’ kids Intuit and Highline Beta launch fintech accelerator Related news Keywords Financial literacyCompanies Canadian Bankers Association The Canadian Bankers Association (CBA) is collaborating with the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada in Ottawa and Toronto-based Prosper Canada to develop a system that will allow financial literacy program providers to measure the effectiveness of their programs. Terry Campbell, president of the Toronto-based CBA, made the announcement at a panel discussion on financial literacy in Toronto on Wednesday that was organized by the Economic Club of Canada. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Report reveals Canadians’ weak knowledge of retirement incomelast_img read more

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Regulators’ proposals would improve access to foreign markets

first_img Keywords Foreign investmentCompanies Canadian Securities Administrators, Ontario Securities Commission CSA announces new prospectus exemption James Langton The Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) published proposed amendments Thursday to enhance foreign market access by introducing a new exemption that would allow investors to resell securities of a foreign issuer outside of Canada under a prospectus exemption, so long as the issuer is not a Canadian reporting issuer. At the same time, the Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) published proposed revisions to its rules dealing with issuer access to foreign markets. Both sets of proposals are out for comment until Sept. 7. The CSA proposals “are intended to address feedback we received that the ownership conditions in the existing exemption have become an impediment to participation by certain market participants in prospectus-exempt offerings by foreign issuers,” the CSA says in the notice issued on Thursday. The CSA proposals would introduce a new definition of a foreign issuer to replace the current 10% Canadian ownership test. “With the increased globalization of capital markets, it may no longer be appropriate to determine minimal connection to Canada based solely on Canadian security holdings,” the CSA notice says. The new approach “would be more straightforward and effective in today’s global market,” the CSA notice adds. The CSA is also reviewing the existing resale regime, overall, to determine whether it remains relevant in today’s markets and to assess alternative approaches. “The proposed amendments would facilitate access to global markets,” says Louis Morisset, chairman of the CSA and president and CEO of the Autorité des marchés financiers (AMF), in a statement. “Canadian investors are increasingly investing abroad, and we understand that some aspects of the current resale regime may pose challenges to participation in prospectus-exempt offerings by foreign issuers.” The related proposals from the OSC deal with issuer access to foreign markets. Last year, the OSC published proposals that were designed to provide a regime for the distribution and resale of securities outside of Canada. Now, it’s revising and republishing its proposals in light of the CSA’s effort to modernize its approach to cross-border exemptions. Meanwhile, the OSC’s new proposal aims tobring “greater certainty” to cross-border activities by clarifying whether a prospectus, or exemption, is required when distributing securities to a foreign investor. The OSC proposal “would provide explicit prospectus and registration exemptions that would preserve current cross-border practices.” It would also harmonize the resale requirements in Ontario with the provisions of the new CSA rule that is being proposed. “This rule is intended to provide certainty to Ontario issuers seeking to raise capital outside of Ontario,” says Huston Loke, director of corporate finance at the OSC, in a statement. “We have made certain revisions to the rule since its initial publication, including removing resale provisions, in the interests of harmonizing resale regimes across Canada for outbound securities.” Photo copyright: stori/123RF Related news Regulators’ proposals would improve access to foreign markets Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

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JTB Begins Travel Agent Road Shows in the UK

first_imgRelatedJTB Begins Travel Agent Road Shows in the UK RelatedJTB Begins Travel Agent Road Shows in the UK FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) will be promoting its new Jamaica Travel Specialist online training programme at www.jamaicatravelspecialist.co.uk, through a series of specialist events across the United Kingdom (UK), beginning Monday, March 13 in East Grinstead, Kent.The programme is specifically designed to help equip frontline agents with in-depth knowledge of Jamaica as a unique and leading destination, and is part of the JTB’s continued support of travel agents.In addition to JTB staff, agents will have the opportunity to interact with representatives from Jamaica’s tourism private sector and discuss current affairs on the island. Jamaican hotels that have already signed on to attend these events include Half Moon, Point Village, Couples Resorts, and Elegant Resorts International, Sunset Beach Resorts, Sandals and Beaches Resorts, SuperClubs and Air Jamaica. The three events are aimed at providing the travel industry with a taste of the real Jamaica. The road show follows on the heels of a record breaking year, in which the island saw its highest ever number of visitors. The JTB is hoping to bring some “sunshine” to the UK during the events that will showcase Jamaica’s offerings to visitors and give agents the chance to sample the distinctive flavours of Jamaican food and drink.One lucky agent at each event will also be given the opportunity to experience all the sights and sounds of the island as the Jamaica Tourist Board will be awarding a prize trip for two, as well as a number of other special prizes and surprises at each of these events.Elizabeth Fox, Regional Director, UK and Ireland for the JTB, said it was important that the Tourist Board show frontline agents they had its full support. “While we will be taking a number of agents down to Jamaica during 2006, we also wanted to bring a little taste of Jamaica to the UK and let agents experience a little bit of Jamaica’s music, culture and hospitality right on their doorstep,” she added. JTB Begins Travel Agent Road Shows in the UK UncategorizedMarch 10, 2006center_img RelatedJTB Begins Travel Agent Road Shows in the UK Advertisementslast_img read more

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UN launches a Women Enterprise Recovery Fund

first_imgUN launches a Women Enterprise Recovery Fund The United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) and the United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF), with support from the Dutch Entrepreneurial Development Bank (FMO), the Government of Canada, and Visa Inc. have launched a ‘Women Enterprise Recovery Fund: Promoting and Upscaling Digital Solutions for Enhancing Women Enterprise Growth and Resilience’.“Through this Fund, we will support innovative business solutions that address the constraints faced by women enterprises in South and South-East Asia. These solutions are especially crucial today as we know women enterprises have suffered disproportionately from COVID-19. Now is the opportunity to innovate and find solutions that recover better and build resilience. UNCDF is grateful to ESCAP, the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Government of Canada, the Dutch Entrepreneurial Development Bank (FMO) and Visa Inc. for their collaboration and support to advance women enterprises through this Innovation Fund mechanism,” said UNCDF Deputy Executive Secretary Xavier Michon.Applicants to the Fund can be based anywhere globally, but the project implementation and solution must target women enterprises in one or more of the following countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Nepal or Viet Nam. Eligible applicants who can apply for the Fund include regulated financial institutions, FinTechs, technology institutions, among others.“The Fund will provide up to US$ 50,000 in co-funding to innovative solutions, along with technical assistance provided through our extensive partner networks. We are pleased to be partnered with UNCDF, FMO, the Government of Canada and Visa Inc. on this exciting initiative, which will bring to market innovative financial and business solutions for women entrepreneurs who have been impacted by the pandemic,” said ESCAP Deputy Executive Secretary Kaveh Zahedi.“FMO is exceptionally pleased to partner with UNCDF and ESCAP to launch the Women Enterprise Recovery Fund. We believe collaboration with private-sector innovators in the design and implementation of digital solutions is fundamental to help women enterprises that have been economically impacted by COVID-19. We are confident the fund will create a catalytic effect in the MSMEs ecosystems across Asia, showcasing viable digital solutions and sustainable business models to respond to the needs of formal and informal women-led enterprises,” said Andrew Shaw, FMO Capacity Development Manager. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Asia, Australia, Australian, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Canada, Commission, entrepreneurs, ESCAP, Foreign Affairs, Government, Indonesia, Myanmar, Nepal, sustainable, U.S., United Nationslast_img read more

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