Premium / Analysis: CH Robinson – too canny for its own good

first_img Reset Your Password Please Login Email* LOGIN New Premium subscriber REGISTER Premium subscriber LOGIN Since 1905, when Charles Henry Robinson teamed up with the Nash Finch brothers to bulk up his wholesale brokerage business before prematurely dying only four years later aged 52, the Eden Prairie-based firm that still carries his name has managed to withstand several headwinds while changing skin seamlessly.Namely, CH Robinson (CHRW):– “Suffered” numerous shareholder changes since it was founded;– Had to face federal regulations that led to a corporate break-up in the ’40s;– Profited from the trucking deregulation stemming from the … Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium Email* << Go back Forgotten your password? Please click here By Alessandro Pasetti 10/05/2021 Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Password* Resetlast_img read more

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Six’s Anna Uzele on Why the Shutdown Is Like a Breakup and Her Unusual Tip for Stress Relief

first_img View Comments Anna Uzele at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre (Photo by Matthew Stocke for Broadway.com) Photos by Matthew Stocke/Matt James Photo NYC for Broadway.comAdditional reporting by Caitlin Moynihan “It was the opening night of Six when everything shut down. My brain was like, ‘OK, your show is not happening. You don’t know when it’s going to happen. You shouldn’t dwell on Broadway.’ I don’t focus on those things because they’re just going to bring up sad memories. Instead I focus out of all the other things going on in my life. It literally felt like I had been dumped by a boyfriend, and then every time we did a press event [after the shutdown], it was like having to hang out with them and talk about old times. I sound terrible, but my first feeling when I found out that we were shut down was actually relief. I’ve never been more exhausted in my entire life. I thought that we were going to get a month-long nap and then come back and regroup to have a great opening night. Once that month had hit, and we realized nobody knows when we’re going to reopen, reality sunk in. My brain had me thinking that it’s not efficient putting your energy [into Broadway], because that doesn’t exist right now. You need to grieve and have all those feelings, but then you need to figure out where to put all this energy. Like what do I do with all my adrenaline at 6PM every night? My body thinks I’m supposed to be starting an opening number…This quarantine has been two chapters for me. The first one was not so good. It felt like survival and self-preservation and turning my energy inward. So much of my energy had been for performing for everyone else, and suddenly that didn’t exist anymore. There was a sense of urgency when it came to taking care of myself. Then summer came and things got warmer and happier: I got myself a little tutoring job, and I’m taking some classes. I’m taking this time to learn as much as possible about the things I’m interested in because now I have the time. My focus has been asking myself, ‘What can I learn? What can I do now, so that when I return to my job, it’s a more equitable and equal industry? What is my part in that? How can I facilitate that?’ We can’t return to what we came from because we’ve learned that what we came from wasn’t good enough. I’ve really been leaning into those conversations…This is going to sound silly, but handstands have brought me so much joy. I got interested in them at the beginning of doing Six. I wasn’t able to balance in my high heels dancing on stage. It occurred to me that if I can stand on my hands and not fall down, then I’d be OK right side up. It’s been an awesome meditative space. If you can’t control the world around you, I can at least control my own body. It’s actually allowed me to release anxiety and stress. I can relinquish control because I’m teaching myself to gain control elsewhere. Don’t worry, I’ve mastered the Catherine Parr heels.”center_img ANNA UZELESIXHours before Anna Uzele was set to take the stage as Catherine Parr for the opening night of Six on March 12, the company found out their starry night had been canceled. Uzele has been with Six since its North American premiere at the Chicago Shakespeare Theater in May 2019, and she made her Broadway debut in the Tony-winning revival of Once on the Island. Here, the performer talks about how her life has changed in the past seven months, the important questions she’s asking, and why life is a little easier to handle when upside down. Living near the theater district during the Broadway shutdown, photographer and performer Matthew Stocke has been haunted walking past the empty palaces sitting in repose, waiting for the lights and stars to return. In this new Broadway.com photo feature, he reunites members of the theater community with their Broadway home #AwayFromHome.last_img read more

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Entities hope for a share of $300 million foreclosure settlement

first_img December 15, 2012 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Entities hope for a share of $300 million foreclosure settlement Entities hope for a share of $300 million foreclosure settlement Senior EditorSitting in an escrow account since April, $300 million in foreclosure settlement money has waited for an agreement between Attorney General Pam Bondi and legislative leaders on how those funds can be spent.Keeping their eyes on the prize are:* State Courts Administra-tor Lisa Goodner, who says she has been promised $5 million to help with Florida’s foreclosure backlog of nearly 380,000 cases and technology needed to move cases faster;* Jane Curran, executive director of The Florida Bar Foundation, grappling with the critical drop in IOTA funding, who proposed that $10 million go directly to the Foundation with the infrastructure in place to distribute funds to legal aid associations, as Bondi had supported; and* Kent Spuhler, managing partner of Florida Legal Services, who is reluctant to give specifics because he said the details are still being negotiated. No one will really know for sure until January, after the Joint Legislative Budget Commission meets again, whether the desperately needed money will be distributed directly to legal aid organizations experienced in representing people facing foreclosure, Curran and Spuhler agree.It’s easier, Spuhler said, to describe the problem. He frets about losing about 150 lawyers, primarily at local legal aid programs, even as Florida has the dubious distinction of the highest foreclosure rate in the nation. One in every 312 homes in Florida is in some stage of foreclosure in October, according to a November report released by RealtyTrac.“Homeowners are still facing foreclosure, and they are facing the consequences of foreclosure, and it’s incredibly destabilizing for families,” Spuhler said.“Things are getting worse, and that’s why it’s critical that this gets decided. Plus, the vast majority of the mortgage settlement is supposed to go to homeowners to help them save their homes. It’s difficult for homeowners to take advantage of that,” he said, without the help of legal representation.The help can’t come soon enough, these three agree. They are cautiously heartened by a news release on November 2, announcing that Bondi, Senate President Don Gaetz, and House Speaker Will Weatherford support a plan for allocating the remaining $300 million recovered for Floridians in a national mortgage settlement.Originally, Bondi had argued that the settlement money didn’t need to go through the Legislature and that she had the authority to decide how it should be spent. But legislative leaders disagreed, saying the Legislature has the sole legal authority to appropriate state dollars.Finally, negotiations produced a compromise.Bondi, Gaetz, and Weatherford joined in a unified voice, issuing this statement: “The plan ensures that the entirety of these funds will be spent consistent with the terms of the settlement agreement, but also that the funds will be allocated through the legislative process.. . . “At the next meeting of the Legislative Budget Commission, with the support of Gaetz and Weatherford, Bondi will seek approval for budget amendments to disburse $60 million of the settlement funds. Bondi anticipates proposing that the $60 million will be used to fund down payment assistance for Floridians, foreclosure-related legal assistance and counseling, state court initiatives to ease the foreclosure backlog, and Attorney General’s Office enforcement efforts.”The balance of the funds, that trio of elected officials said, will be allocated through the appropriations process in the upcoming legislative session, which means most of the settlement dollars won’t be spent until the next fiscal year begins July 1.“Gaetz and Weatherford have agreed to support the appropriation of approximately $200 million for housing-related purposes, consistent with the terms of the settlement agreement,” the statement continued.“Although the specific appropriations must be determined through the legislative process, possible use of these funds include foreclosure prevention, neighborhood revitalization, affordable housing, homebuyer or renter assistance, legal assistance, counseling, and other housing-related programs.“Finally, consistent with the discretion afforded her under the settlement agreement, Bondi will designate approximately $40 million of the settlement funds as additional civil penalties.”Bondi said: “This plan gets much-needed assistance to the homeowners and communities suffering the effects of the foreclosure crisis, and ensures that the settlement funds are spent with the transparency, accountability, and flexibility that come from the legislative process.”That’s in addition to about $7.5 billion in expected mortgage assistance that Floridians are supposed to receive directly from banks, as part of the landmark national $25 billion joint federal-state agreement with the nation’s five largest mortgage servicers over foreclosure abuses and unacceptable nationwide mortgage servicing practices.Wells Fargo, JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Citi, and Ally/GMAC agreed to the national settlement, after allegations surfaced that fraudulent documents were used to foreclose on homeowners.As of September 30, Bondi said in a separate November 19 news release, the nation’s five largest mortgages servicers have provided more than $3.6 billion in borrower relief to Floridians, with an additional $1.3 billion in modification relief in the pipeline. The servicers reported that 48,998 Floridians have benefitted from an average of $73,663 in relief per borrower. Consumer relief can include the following: first and second lien modifications; enhanced borrower transitional funds; facilitation of short sales; deficiency waivers; forbearance for unemployed borrowers; anti-blight activities; refinancing programs; and benefits for members of the Armed Forces.Florida borrowers who lost their homes to foreclosure between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, and who may be eligible for payment under the foreclosure settlement must file claims by January 18, 2013, Bondi said, adding that forms have been mailed to qualified borrowers.“Florida was one of only two states in the country that negotiated a guarantee in the settlement,” Bondi said. “The fact that servicers report $3.6 billion in relief to Florida’s borrowers within the first eight months of implementation is a promising indication that obtaining a minimum commitment from the banks has been effective.”If all goes according to plan and OSCA receives $5 million, Goodner said the money will be used for two purposes: to effectively whittle down the backlog of foreclosure cases, numbering 379,577, as of September 2012, and to help with technology so judges will be able to work with an electronic court record to move cases more efficiently.“What we understand from a number of our circuits, where they don’t have much automation, part of the workload is the amount of paper they have to contend with that requires a lot of time and effort,” Goodner said.Some courts, such as Manatee County, have efficiently used electronic records, and the foreclosure backlog there is only 6,795.An example of a “paper-intensive” county, Goodner said, is Miami-Dade, where they are trying to get through 51,723 backlogged foreclosures.“It’s not for lack of effort or desire or will to do this,” Goodner was quick to add.“It’s just resources that have stymied the effort in some circuits, more than others. That’s what we’re trying to address.”The plan on how to spend the money will be hammered out by the Trial Court Budget Commission, she said, after receiving proposals from chief judges and court administrators on how they would go about using additional resources.Meanwhile, Goodner, Curran, and Spuhler hope the promises they’ve heard from Bondi and legislative leaders are fulfilled as soon as possible.“We don’t have details on how much or when it will be distributed. Right now, it’s all sort of promises and you hear a number. And then we’ve heard different numbers,” Spuhler said. “Every day we are working to nail that down. I think it’s January before we really know.”last_img read more

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Benefits of tough early-season schedule beginto show for Minnesota

first_imgMinnesota opened the season at No. 3 Virginia and then fell to No. 13 Washington before pulling an upset of No. 21 Tulane.When you throw in the fact that a whopping seven of the Gophers’ opponents have been ranked in the nation’s top 35, Minnesota’s 4-9 record doesn’t sound so bad after all.In fact, Ticer said the tough competition the team had in its nonconference schedule has helped it far more than beating up on lesser teams.“Teams we’re playing now aren’t quite as high-level as our nonconference opponents were,” Ticer said. “We lost those matches, but they’re definitely helping us now.”Another thing helping the Gophers rise to the top of the Big Ten under interim coach David Wheaton is the presence of its full squad.The return of Andres Osorio and D.J. Geatz from suspension has bolstered the team, and Ticer said Minnesota definitely missed its No. 2 doubles tandem and usual Nos. 3 and 5 singles players when they were out.“I think having our whole squad is helping us a lot,” Ticer said. “D.J. and Andres are two guys that can play almost anywhere in the lineup, and the younger guys are getting match-tough.”With three matches – including Big Ten foes Wisconsin and Northwestern – on the team’s slate this weekend, Wheaton said he has high expectations for his Minnesota squad.“Our goal is to win the Big Ten title,” Wheaton said. “If we impose ourselves on the other teams out there, there’s no reason for not doing very well the rest of the season.” Benefits of tough early-season schedule beginto show for Minnesota Rowena VergaraApril 5, 2005Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintNo matter how you look at it, a 4-9 record isn’t pretty.And no matter how it’s justified, if nothing else, a 4-9 record is nothing to brag about. Some would even view it as relative futility.But Minnesota’s men’s tennis team sees its rather ghastly record in a remarkably positive light.“We played a really tough nonconference schedule,” sophomore Mikey Kantar said. “Our 4-9 record is better than Michigan’s 11-7, because we’ve played tougher teams.”That kind of maxim was validated during the weekend when the Gophers swept both the Wolverines (11-7, 4-1 Big Ten) and Michigan State (11-8, 3-2) by convincing scores of 5-2 and 6-1, respectively.So although Minnesota’s overall record might be ugly, the team’s conference record is a promising 3-1.“Teams in the Big Ten are younger than the more experienced teams we played in nonconference,” senior Avery Ticer said. “We would have been happy to be just .500 with our nonconference schedule.”Instead, the Gophers struggled in dual after dual this spring.But it’s hard to blame the team for having more losses than wins because of its veritable murderer’s row of a schedule.last_img read more

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A new experimental system sheds light on how memory loss may occur

first_imgBrain activity in the hippocampus changes after silencing the enthorinal cortex“We know that the hippocampal neurons generate pulses of activity when the animal is in a particular space,” said co-corresponding author Dr. Daoyun Ji, assistant professor of molecular & cell biology at Baylor.To measure the electrical activity in the hippocampus, the researchers inserted tiny probes – thinner than a human hair – into the brains of mice. “We inserted the probes into the hippocampus where they could detect the electrical signal generated by active neurons. We recorded this signal while the animal explored its surroundings. As the mouse learned its environment, we picked up the electrical pulses produced by the neurons – up to 50 neurons simultaneously – so that we could examine the pattern that emerged. When the animal was in one area of the room, a particular brain pattern emerged. The pattern changed as the animal moved to another area. We could predict where the animal was by looking at its pattern of brain activity,” said Ji.When the researchers turned off the entorhinal cortex with ivermectin, they saw the pattern of electrical signals in the hippocampus changed. Signals that had previously been associated with a particular location now became active in a different part of the room. “We found that the hippocampus had remapped, the memory code was scrambled,” said Ji. But would mice whose mental map had rearranged itself also lose their memory for the location they learned before re-mapping?To answer this question, the researchers trained mice to find a hidden escape platform submerged in a water maze using visual clues. Then some of the mice received ivermectin to inactivate the entorhinal cortex, while others did not. “The mice had been trained for 7 to 10 days, so they knew where to go to escape the pool. But when we turned off the entorhinal cortex, their hippocampal map got scrambled and the animals couldn’t remember how to exit the pool,” said Ji.“Our findings put us one step closer to understanding how our hippocampus may be required not only to learn a new environment, but also to remember it later,” said Jankowsky. “The system we used to silence neurons with ivermectin adds to a growing set of genetic tools created over the last 10 years to probe brain function. Because ivermectin is both safe and inexpensive, this particular system can be used for longer periods of inactivation appropriate for studying chronic conditions like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. That’s the thing I am most excited about with this work,” said Jankowsky. Share on Facebook Email Share Share on Twittercenter_img Pinterest LinkedIn Two interconnected brain areas – the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex – help us to know where we are and to remember it later. By studying these brain areas, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute have uncovered new information about how dysfunction of this circuit may contribute to memory loss in Alzheimer’s disease. Their results appear in Cell Reports.“We created a new mouse model in which we showed that spatial memory decays when the entorhinal cortex is not functioning properly,” said co-corresponding author Dr. Joanna Jankowsky, associate professor of neuroscience at Baylor. “I think of the entorhinal area as a funnel. It takes information from other sensory cortices – the parts of the brain responsible for vision, hearing, smell, touch, and taste – and funnels it into the hippocampus. The hippocampus then binds this disparate information into a cohesive memory that can be reactivated in full by recalling only one part. But the hippocampus also plays a role in spatial navigation by telling us where we are in the world. These two functions converge in the same cells, and our study set out to examine this duality.”The new mouse model was genetically engineered to carry a particular surface receptor on the cells of the entorhinal cortex. When this receptor was activated by administering the drug ivermectin to the mice, the cells of the entorhinal cortex silenced their activity. They stopped funnelling information to the hippocampus. This system allowed the scientists to turn off the entorhinal cortex, and to determine how this affected hippocampal function.last_img read more

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Affinia Global Brake & Chassis Names Senior Vice President Sales

first_imgANN ARBOR, Mich. – Bruce Tartaglione has been named senior vice president of sales for Affinia Global Brake & Chassis. In his new position, Tartaglione will be responsible for management of a global sales organization representing the Raybestos brand and private label offerings. He has more than 30 years of leadership experience in the automotive aftermarket. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement “Bruce brings a strong customer-centric focus to his new position with a long track record of successfully identifying product and service needs, coupled with quickly bringing innovative solutions to market,” said H. David Overbeeke, president of Affinia Global Brake & Chassis. “Best of all, Bruce champions a value-added sales approach, anchored in exceptional customer service, category management, marketing and technical training that are essential complements to our World Smart business strategy of offering consistently high quality and competitively priced products.” Tartaglione comes to Affinia from United Components Inc. of Evansville, Ind., where he served as vice president of traditional aftermarket. In this position, he was responsible for coordinating aftermarket sales for four business units, while piloting a digital marketing initiative. He has also previously held management positions with Standard Motor Products and BWD (Echlin/Dana). Throughout his career, Tartaglione has worked closely with retail customers on strategic marketing initiatives while fostering corporate cultures that support long-term aftermarket relationships.            “Today’s successful sales organizations combine an intense focus on product innovation, digital-based marketing and responsive customer service, all within a global perspective on supply chains,” Tartaglione said. “Affinia Global Brake & Chassis has established itself as a leader in the aftermarket with its World Smart approach, and I look forward to joining a team clearly on the leading edge.”Advertisement Tartaglione is active with several aftermarket trade organizations, including service on the AAIA Marketing and Membership Committee since 2007 and membership with the AWDA Manufacturers’ Advisory Council since 2005.  He attended Lakeland College in Mentor, Ohio.last_img read more

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Lunch With A Leader: Self Help; LA Cares July 16

first_imgLWVLA News:This month’s Lunch with a Leader presented for the community by the League of Women Voters is 11:45 a.m., July 16 in Mesa Public Library.Two very important Los Alamos based services, Self Help, Inc. and LA Cares will be presenting.Speaking for LA Cares is Linda Burns. She is originally from Delaware, but she and her husband Don came to Los Alamos 30 years ago, by way of Wisconsin and New York, where their three children grew up.Burns graduated from Ursinus College with a major in math, and the University of Michigan where she earned a master’s in library science. She was the assistant librarian of the Library Commission for the State of Delaware and then a stay at home mom but did medical transcriptions part time.She was looking for an activity, after years of volunteering in both Boy and Girl Scouting, PTA, when she saw a small item in the Monitor “Food Distribution… This month seeking donations of pasta and pasta sauce.” That did it, and here she is, more than 24 years later, 22 of them serving as secretary of the LA Cares Board.The other speaker, Taylor, arrived in Los Alamos as an 8th grade student. After graduating from Los Alamos High School, she went to Lewis and Clark College where she graduated summa cum laude with a degree in economics. She left work in Portland, Ore. as a financial analyst to take her dream job managing a nonprofit in the town that she took for granted growing up. In her free time, Taylor sings as a solo performer as well as member and founder of several ensembles.There will be lunch from the CO+OP for those who wish to order one. Contact Karyl Ann Armbruster for a description of food selections available at [email protected] or 505.231.8286.last_img read more

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Fr. Glenn: Dogged Determination

first_imgBy Fr. Glenn JonesA happy La Fête Nationale for all you French folk out there, or “Bastille Day” for we non-French speakers. Americans have camaraderie with you in having our independence day so near your own, as we benefited the early assistance of the likes of the Marquis de Lafayette in our own struggle for independence. Viva la France! … y’all. Let Le Marseillaise ring all around.In recalling these days of independence, one cannot help but admire that dogged determination and self-sacrifice offered by those who were in the midst of those landmark historical times and events. A difficult way they traveled as they set a course through uncharted waters, and had they been dissuaded by initial struggles, we might not have these celebrations to this day. What a different world we might be living in today. Who would have thought that a motley crew of farmers and tradesmen could prevail over the mightiest empire of the day?Such unexpected results came to mind in reading the texts for the Mass Saturday—the story of Joseph and his brothers in Egypt near the end of the book of Genesis. You may recall that out of envy, Joseph had been sold into slavery by his brothers, but by divinely-influenced turns of events, Joseph eventually came to great power and authority in Egypt. Years later when his brothers come under his authority, they fear for their lives lest Joseph vindictive. But, in beautifully poignant assurance, Joseph simply says: “Have no fear. Can I take the place of God? Even though you meant harm to me, God meant it for good, to achieve his present end, the survival of many people.” (Genesis 50:20)What a wonderful foreshadowing Joseph gives of the forgiveness that Jesus would teach centuries later: “Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you…” (Luke 6:37-38) and “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ [sounds like our world today, doesn’t it?] But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven…?” (Matthew 5:43-45)But secondly, and more to our beginning theme: We never know how events will turn out over time. For instance, who would have thought that Nelson Mandela—imprisoned for decades—would become President of South Africa. We’ve all heard rags-to-riches stories such as Bill Gates and Michael Dell beginning their huge tech empires out of garage workshops, Abraham Lincoln the rail splitter becoming one of our greatest presidents, and no small number of popes beginning life in poverty. They came to their positions only through dogged determination.We tend to easily get discouraged or to despair when things don’t go how we’d like, or the way that we expect or plan. Yet everyone endures hardships and trials to one degree or another in their lives; in fact, such things are what can make us even stronger. Our lives are a bit like the stock market: there are swings both to the good and to the bad, but the successful person learns from hardship and continues to work (and pray) for a trending “bull (good) market” over their lifetimes—hopefully to our greater spiritual and happiness profit.When we’re down, we Catholics read the lives of the saints, for in those accounts is much long-suffering and difficulty, yet dogged determination especially in those times of sorrow and woe.  The saints knew that whatever their trials and struggles on earth, their true reward was  not from temporal success or failure, but by fidelity to Christ … remembering St. Paul: “…we are children of God, and if children, then heirs, heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ, provided we suffer with him in order that we may also be glorified with him. I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worth comparing with the glory that is to be revealed to us.” (Romans 8:16-18) How similar St. Paul’s declaration to that which must have been filled in the minds of those who struggled for independence in America and France over two centuries ago—to struggle for a greater good. So … if THEY fought so determinedly for an earthly treasure, so to speak, would not the wise endure through all struggles to obtain the Heavenly treasure? The early American colonists and French fought against perceived tyranny to have freedom; we Christians struggle to obtain something infinitely better, as St. John tells us … a “…new Jerusalem…[where] the dwelling of God is with men. He will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself will be with them; He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning nor crying nor pain any more, for the former things have passed away.” (Revelation 21:2-4)The early leaders of the American colonies declared in the Declaration of Independence:  “…with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor.” Not upon an easy road were they setting out upon; they knew that untold struggles awaited. But they accepted the challenge nonetheless, determined to work for a greater good. May WE also have such fortitude to work for a greater good … despite hardships, despite sadness, despite disappointments … always seeking the welfare and benefit of all. “Do nothing from selfishness or conceit, but in humility count others better than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”  (Philippians 2:3-4)Rev. Glenn Jones is the Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe and former pastor of Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church in Los Alamos.last_img read more

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New Study Shows Los Alamos County Residents Most Generous Givers In New Mexico

first_imgCOMMUNITY News:The holiday season is synonymous with spending money – but for more than just buying gifts.According to Nonprofits Source, hundreds of millions of dollars are raised for charity on Giving Tuesday alone, which is just a fraction of the billions of dollars Americans donate each year.In a recent study, financial technology company SmartAsset dug into IRS data to find the places where residents were giving the most. The study measured how much people donate as a percentage of their net income and the proportion of people in a given county who make charitable donations.Los Alamos County ranked among the most charitable in New Mexico.For more information on the study, including the methodology and infographic, check here: https://smartadvisormatch.com/data/most-generous-counties-2019/new-mexico For a look at how the top counties in New Mexico stacked up, check out the table below:last_img read more

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Cinema Cindy Reviews: Portrait Of A Lady On Fire

first_imgBy CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMBLos Alamos“Portrait of a Lady on Fire”, is a two-hour long, French film that won writer/director Céline Sciamma Best Screenplay at the Cannes Film Festival in 2019.Originally titled —in this story, is a young woman, untested by the real world.If you choose to see this film, expect to patiently soak up long cinematic takes of wonder and beauty. This is a film is for those who don’t mind reading subtitles and who are open to seeing two women grow in attraction to each other. It is “Rated R for some nudity and sexuality”.The first scene takes place in an art studio at the end of the 18th century, where a woman is teaching young girls to paint. Girls of a certain social class in that era were taught the arts in order to appear accomplished and worthy of marriage to a fine gentleman. There were very few young women whose gift for artistic endeavor would have given them the economic viability necessary to be able to avoid being married off to the highest bidder. But such is our heroine.Marianne, played by Noémie Merlant, is the daughter of a successful portrait artist. She will one day partner with her father in his business and have a choice about whether or not to marry. We learn this in the extended flashback that makes up the majority of the film. She is taken back in her memory to a time when she was hired to paint a portrait at a house on an island off the Brittany coast.The subject of the portrait was a young woman who, after the death of her sister, was brought home from her convent to marry a Milanese gentleman. Her portrait has been requested by the prospective husband in this marriage, arranged by her mother, a countess.Marianne, the painter, arrives by boat, weighed down with her painting supplies, some canvasses and a few clothes. Awaiting her is the Countess (Valeria Golino), whose portrait hangs over a fireplace; it is a portrait that Marianne’s father had painted when the Countess was young and about to be married herself. The Countess informs Marianne that her daughter, Héloïse (played by Adèle Haenel) had refused to sit for an earlier portrait artist. So, Marianne is to pretend to have been hired to keep Héloïse company on long walks out of doors. The portrait will have to be painted from memory. Sophie the maid (played by Luàna Bajrami) is the only other person in the house, besides the Countess and Héloïse, but she is in on the ruse to get the portrait done.What unfolds in this story, in slow, deliberate scenes of stunning beauty and emotion, are relationships that transcend those expected among social classes. The daughter of a countess, a woman in a trade (portrait painting), and a maid who serves them both, bond in different ways, each overcoming for a time their lot in life.Rather than emphasizing the class differences among them, the film presents them as equally intriguing. Marianne, the independent painter, represents the liberty they each crave. Héloïse, is naïve but bold, ravenous to learn how Marianne sees life. In committing Héloïse’s features to memory, Marianne absorbs Héloïse, each becoming entranced with the another. Passion ensues, on a very slow but steady trajectory. The cinematography in this film is fantastic … the palette of colors, the lighting, the textures, the sensuality, and the sparse but poignant use of music … all of it is exquisite. In addition to this sensual feast is an equally vibrant emotional feast—long, slow takes focusing on a face as it transitions from feelings of wonder, to those of deep love, and great loss. A triumph on film!last_img read more

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