Gardai in Donegal warn of resurgence in petrol station break-ins

first_img Twitter AudioHomepage BannerNews Twitter By News Highland – October 30, 2019 Pinterest Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Gardai in Donegal are warning rural petrol station owners locally to be on high alert over what’s been described as a resurgence of break ins. Filling stations in Carlow and Kilkenny have been targeted in recent weeks with Gardai here advising that gangs are very mobile and could potentially travel on to the county.Last winter, up to eight such businesses in Donegal were hit by a criminal gang with some later apprehended by Gardai in the Donegal Town area.Crime Prevention Officer Sgt Paula Wallace is urging business owners to urgently review their security measures:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/paudfgdfgdfgdflwallace.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Facebook Facebook Google+center_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Gardai in Donegal warn of resurgence in petrol station break-ins RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Previous articleMassive power outage affecting parts of LetterkennyNext articleUpdate: Power restored to all areas of Letterkenny News Highland Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApplast_img read more

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Premium / Against the odds: Up in (northern) lights – Part 2

first_img Please either REGISTER or login below to continue LOGIN Please Login From “Whatever (and whichever) canal floats your boat – Part 1” to my coverage today is a small, albeit meaningful, step.Here it goes.Russia’s northern trade route A brief recap, as I argued yesterday towards the end of my post:“Russia has been touting its Northern Trade Route, an Arctic Ocean route to Asia, since the Ever Given issue.Claiming to trim 4,000 nautical miles and 15 days off the southern alternative via the Suez Canal, Russia expects cargoes to increase through the Northern … Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium New Premium subscriber REGISTER Email* << Go back By Mr Joy 16/04/2021 Premium subscriber LOGIN Email* Reset Your Password Password* Forgotten your password? Please click here Resetlast_img read more

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2020 EaP Civil Society Fellowships – Call for Applications

first_img Siena International Photo Award 2020 → Reddit LinkedIn 0 Pocket Share 0 Tweet 2020 EaP Civil Society Fellowships – Call for Applicationscenter_img Deadline: 13 January 2020Open to: nationals of one of the Eastern Partnership countries which propose a set of activities aimed at addressing problems in the lives of the applicants’ communities, regions and countriesBenefits: the maximum amount of financial support available within the Fellowship Programme is EUR 5,000 per personDescriptionThe European Union is committed to supporting civil society in Eastern Partnership (EaP) countries. Developing the leadership capacities and skills of future civil society leaders is one of the commitments made by the European Union in its policy on achieving ’20 Deliverables for 2020’.This support is an investment in the development of young civic activists or civically minded individuals from the EaP region, who display interest and ability in taking leading roles in the development of their societies. The Eastern Partnership Civil Society Fellowships are an integral part of the European Union’s Eastern Partnership Civil Society Facility.Fellows are invited to participate in different capacity and skills development activities, and receive up to 5,000 EUR to develop and conduct their own civic activities, under the supervision of a mentor or within a certain civil society organisation in the European Union or the EaP region. Examples of supported projects include: an audit of public transport and accessibility issues, advocacy on financial crimes, improvement of quality of local playgrounds, e-democracy, development of capacities of professional associations, etc. Fellows received access to trainings, summer schools, internships, as well as a relevant network that may help them achieve their leadership potential. They were selected based on their qualifications, leadership potential and level of community engagement.EligibilityThere are three sets of eligibility criteria, relating to:(1) the applicants:(2) the actions:(3) the costs.Eligibility of applicants – In order to be eligible for a fellowship the applicant must:be a natural person;be a national of one of the Eastern Partnership countries (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine);be born on or after 01/01/1985;not previously have benefited from the fellowship within this programme;have a proven track record of:a. working in a civil society organisation, including Trade Unions or professional association orb. taking a leading role in his/her community by advancing issues related to health, environment, social development, transparency, etc. in one form or another;have a good working level of English, as well as have appropriate language skills for the chosen location of the proposed action;assume responsibility for the action proposed and show commitment for the action proposed.Eligible actions – The proposed action should focus on a set of activities aimed at addressing problems in the lives of the applicants’ communities, regions and countries by promoting reforms and increasing public accountability and/or monitoring of the performance of governmental institutions. The result of the proposed action should also have a positive influence on the development of the applicant’s leadership skills. The proposed Action should be implemented within 6 months (starting in March – April 2020) and include realistic and ideally sustainable results.The fellowship programme will provide support in the following broad areas of activities:Research or monitoring of how public services are delivered at national / community level;Drafting policy papers and recommendations for decision-makers;Supporting mentoring and job shadowing schemes in order to build capacities that can be transferred to other members of the organisation;Advocacy campaigns on issues of public concern;Better tailoring civil society organisations’ activities to citizens’ needs;Developing new solutions for e-transparency and e-participation;Bringing civil society and authorities together to develop common solutions;Strengthening organizations’ capacity to act effectively;Cooperation between civil society organisations, including trade unions and professional associations on issues of common interest;Other areas of activities relevant to the fellows’ communities.Eligibility of costs – The proposed budget for a fellowship action should be realistic and be based on the objectives and activities set out in the fellowship action proposal.The proposed budget should not exceed EUR 5,000.BenefitsThe maximum amount of financial support available within the Fellowship Programme is EUR 5,000 per person.How to apply?Applications for 2020 Civil Society Leadership Programme are accepted via the online application system or by email sent to [email protected] further information check the official website. Similar Stories November 21, 2019 Published by Bojana ← The Erasmus Mundus Scholarship Programme 2020/2022 +1last_img read more

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VDH COVID-19 Update: Public schools to open in the fall with in-person instruction

first_img1,334 (9 new) 29 * Includes testing conducted at the Health Department Laboratory, commercial labs and other public health labs.+ Death occurring in persons known to have COVID-19. Death certificate may be pending. Hospitalization data is provided by the Vermont Healthcare Emergency Preparedness Coalition and is based on hospitals updating this information.Find more at the data dashboard: healthvermont.gov/currentactivity(link is external).Get Tested for COVID-19People who want to be tested can contact their health care provider for a referral.For people who do not have symptoms of COVID-19, pop-up sites for testing are currently scheduled through July. The sites operate from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. See how to get tested and to make an appointment(link is external).Protest SafelyWe support Vermonters engaging in peaceful protests and other civic activities to make their voices heard. Large gatherings pose a greater risk for virus exposure. So, wear a mask when near others, maintain a 6-foot distance, and if you’re sick, find actions to make yourself heard from home. We encourage anyone who is participating in a public action to get tested for COVID-19. Learn more about how to get tested(link is external).Guidance for VermontersIf you are having a medical emergency, call 9-1-1 or go to the hospital.If you are having even mild symptoms of COVID-19(link is external), call your health care provider.Maintain physical distancing of at least 6 feet and wear a mask when near others(link is external).Visit our Frequently Asked Questions(link is external).Traveler InformationGet the latest info about travel to Vermont(link is external), including about quarantine requirements, testing, and to sign up with Sara Alert for symptom check reminders(link is external).  Take Care of Your Emotional and Mental HealthIf you or someone you know is in crisis or needs emotional support, help is available 24/7:Call your local mental health crisis line(link is external) Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline(link is external) at 1-800-273-8255Text VT to 741741 to talk with someone at the Crisis Text Line(link is external).For more information visit healthvermont.gov/suicide(link is external).See ways for Coping with Stress(link is external).  For more information:COVID-19 health information, guidance and case data: healthvermont.gov/covid19(link is external).Governor’s actions: governor.vermont.gov/covid19response(link is external).The state’s modeling: dfr.vermont.gov/about-us/covid-19/modeling(link is external). Travelers monitored Vermont Business Magazine Governor Phil Scott announced today that Vermont’s K-12 public schools will open in the fall with in-person instruction. Scott said it is important for the intellectual, emotional and social development of children to be back at school. He said the health data indicate that children are far less likely transmitters of COVID-19. School districts will be given as much flexibility as possible to tailor their school reopening plans to their local needs, with assistance from the state.Health guidance includes a mandate to wear a cloth facial covering, health checks and social distancing requirements in the buildings and classrooms. Hybrid learning with online programs will be available as needed for students who choose not to attend or are unable to do so.Health Commissioner Dr Mark Levine also updated the possible Manchester region COVID-19 outbreak. So far, there are only two positive cases confirmed with over 400 people tested.However, he added that of the 59 people that were “presumptive positive” from earlier antigen tests, only 17 results from PCR testing have been returned from the lab. Statewide, there were nine new cases of COVID-19, with four hospitalized and deaths holding at 56, where they have been for over a month.Daily Update on Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)July 17, 2020New information is in red and bold.This update is available online at healthvermont.gov/covid19(link is external)Click the “See the Latest Update” button.Please visit the Vermont Department of Health’s COVID-19 web and data pageshealthvermont.gov/covid19(link is external)Investigation of positive antigen test results in ManchesterHealth Commissioner Mark Levine, MD provided an update at Friday’s press conference on reports of 59 positive COVID-19 antigen tests from Manchester Medical Center.So far, 17 of the 59 people have since had a PCR test, which is recommended to confirm the positive antigen result.Of the 17 people, 15 were negative and 2 were positive. Although our investigation is not complete, it appears that many of the positive antigen results reported by Manchester Medical Center may have been false positives, Dr. Levine said.There are a number of reasons why this can happen, but it may be due to the use of antigen tests for people without symptoms. Many of the 59 people who tested positive with the antigen test did not have symptoms. The antigen test is recommended by the CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories(link is external) to be used for people WITH symptoms,. We don’t have evidence about the accuracy of the antigen test on people without symptoms. Dr. Levine also shared details about the testing offered at popup sites in the communities of Manchester and Londonderry.So far, our lab has reported that all 405 of the specimens analyzed were negative. “This is good indication that these cases are not spreading within the community,” he said. Health officials continue to investigate the situation, and treat all positive antigen tests the same as any positive case – reaching out to each person, giving them guidance to isolate, tracing their contacts, and recommending they get a confirmatory PCR test.“We are learning more about antigen tests, and they are a useful tool for screening patients who do have symptoms,” Dr. Levine said. “But our recent PCR results are showing us why they need to be confirmed, so we have a more accurate picture of current infection in patients.”If you are concerned that you may have been exposed to someone who has tested positive, please contact your health care provider to see if you should be tested.  All Vermonters should continue following the same simple actions to prevent the spread of COVID-19:•       Wear a face mask when around others if you are able•       Keep 6 feet apart•       Wash your hands frequently•       Stay home when you’re sickHealth officials say science shows Vermont schools can open safely in the fallOfficials on Friday outlined the careful public health considerations that have gone into guidance to reopen schools(link is external) this fall.Dr. Levine emphasized that we know much more about the virus now than we did in March, can track data in real time, and respond to cases quickly with our contact tracing teams.“Vermont’s guidance is clearly and emphatically focused on safety of teachers, students and staff,” he said, while also taking into account the negative impact on children of not reopening schools.Governor Phil Scott noted that kids need structure, relationships with their peers, their teachers, and other adults for their academic, social, and emotional development.“We know there are already equity gaps based on differences in kids’ needs, their home environments, and countless other variables, and these are exacerbated when educating only through remote learning,” Scott said. The governor made clear abundant safety precautions and restrictions – developed with public health and infectious disease professionals – will be in place to protect students, teachers and staff, and that all decisions will continue to be guided by the latest public health data and science.State Epidemiologist Patsy Kelso acknowledged that we are seeing more cases of COVID-19 in children nationwide and in Vermont, but this is not surprising as states have reopened, and more testing has become available. Children still make up a minority of cases. Vermont’s guidance focuses on keeping COVID-19 out of schools with daily screenings, but we recognize there may be cases. That’s why additional measures are meant to keep it from spreading, through physical distancing, masks and contact tracing.“We’ve know our own data, have studied data from other countries, and now have experience from child care facilities being open in Vermont.”“Vermont stands with the science… and we continue to do so,” Kelso said.The objectives of this health guidance for schools(link is external) during the coming year are to:1. Decrease risk of individuals infected with COVID-19 from entering the school building through effective public health prevention2. Decrease transmission of COVID-19 among staff and students through effective public health measures3. Quickly identify individuals with COVID-19 and put containment procedures in place to minimize the impact on students, staff and education4. Ensure that the special needs of students with physical, emotional and behavioral concerns are thoroughly addressed in a fair and equitable manner5. Communicate regularly with staff, students, families and the community to provide assurances that schools are working to keep students and staff safe and healthy6. Ensure that COVID-19 health guidance safeguards an equitable educational experience for all studentsYou will see a number of references to guidance for Steps II and III throughout this document, in accordance with CDC guidelines. These steps, as they pertain to schools, are defined as:• Step I: Schools are closed for in-person instruction. Remote learning opportunities should be provided for all students. Support provision of student services such as school meal programs, as feasible.• Step II: Schools are open for in-person instruction with enhanced physical distancing measures and for children who live in the local geographic area only.• Step III: Schools are open for in-person instruction with distancing measures. Restrict attendance to those from limited transmission areas (other Step III areas) only.The Agency of Education has made the decision to start schools at Step II, with the exception of school bus transportation (see Buses and Transportation), in order to ensure that schools are prepared in the event of an increase in community-wide spread of COVID-19. The decision to move from Step II to III (and if necessary, back to Step II) will be made based on the epidemiological evidence (metrics) at the regional level and in coordination with the AOE and the Health Department.Facial Coverings and Personal Protective EquipmentAll staff and students are required to wear facial coverings while in the building, as well as outside where physical distancing cannot be maintained.Vermont is using the following metrics to determine what Phase (Step) it is in:• Indicators based on symptoms:(1) Downward trajectory of influenza-like illnesses (ILI syndrome) reported within a 14-day period; AND,(2) Downward trajectory of COVID-like syndromic cases (i.e., COVID-like illness or CLI syndrome) reported within a 14-day period• Indicators based on cases:(3) Downward trajectory of documented COVID-19 cases within a 14-day period; OR(4) Downward trajectory of positive tests as a percent of total tests within a 14-day period (concurrent with a flat or increasing volume of tests)• Indicators for hospital readiness:(5) Capacity to treat all patients without utilization of crisis care standards; AND(6) Robust testing program in place for at-risk healthcare workers, including antibody testingNew on healthvermont.gov(link is external)This week’s Weekly Summary of Vermont COVID-19 Data(link is external) has been posted, with a spotlight on county profiles. You can also find all the past weekly summaries at the same link.A new map has been added to the Data Dashboard(link is external). “Percent of Population Tested by County,” shows the percent of residents by county that have been tested.Data note: The number of people tested displayed in the dashboard dropped by less than 300 people on July 16. This is due to a new method being used that improves the quality of the demographic information about people tested and removes duplicates. The change also affects the numbers in the “Total People Tested” graph and “People Tested by Day” graph.Case InformationCurrent COVID-19 Activity in VermontAs of 12 p.m. on July 17, 2020 Description Contacts monitored 4 105 People tested Total cases* Deaths+center_img Number Hospitalized under investigation 1,121 1,338 Total people recovered Currently hospitalized 56 People completed monitoring 3,757last_img read more

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Most complained-about credit card companies

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Thousands of Americans are lodging complaints with the government’s financial watchdog about their credit cards, and some issuers are being griped about a lot more than others.By Blake Ellis  @blakeellis3Of the more than 25,000 credit card complaints the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has processed between the November 2011 launch of its complaint database and last September, Capital One received the biggest share, according to new analysis from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group.Roughly 21% of all complaints were made about Capital One, followed by 18% about Citibank, 13% for Bank of America and 13% about Chase. Capital One said that it no longer has the highest number of complaints, based on more recent data from the CFPB’s complaint database, and that it remains “committed to working with our customers to resolve any issues they may have.”Related: Target hack is mostly harmless for consumersBased on the ratio of complaints to card purchase volume, however, GE Capital Retail garnered the highest number of grievances through September — with 88 complaints for every $1 billion in purchase volume. Some of these complaints sparked the CFPB to take legal action last month, ordering GE Capital’s medical credit card business to repay $34.1 million to more than one million customers for misleading them into thinking they were signing up for an interest-free line of credit.GE Capital said it disputes this finding, calling the data used “incorrect,” according to spokeswoman Dori Abel. The card issuer believes a more appropriate ratio to look at is the number of complaints versus the number of accounts, and said it received only two complaints for every 1 million accounts using that measure.GE Capital spokeswoman Dori Abel said the PIRG findings were based on “incorrect data,” and that its purchase volume is more than three times the amount PIRG used. That resulted in a “material difference in the calculations,” Abel said. The actual number should be closer to 17 or 18 complaints per $1 billion in transactions, not 88 as PIRG found, she said. continue reading »last_img read more

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Gophers volleyball avenge midweek loss with sweep

first_imgGophers volleyball avenge midweek loss with sweepMinnesota tallied its eighth sweep of the season Sunday over Northwestern.Gophers sophomore Samantha Seliger-Swenson sets the ball on Friday, Sept. 23, 2016 in a match against Maryland in the Sports Pavillon.  Tommy SlettenOctober 11, 2016Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintNo. 1 Minnesota found redemption after Friday’s away loss to Penn State, sweeping Northwestern in straight sets.“Obviously the Penn State loss was tough, but we know we need to get better,” senior middle blocker Hannah Tapp said. “Hopefully we can take that loss and learn from it. We were looking forward to coming out here and playing well, which I think we did.”Minnesota saw strong performances from senior outside hitter Sarah Wilhite who had 14 kills and 9 digs, and junior libero Dalianliz Rosado who had 11 digs. Sophomore setter Samantha Seliger-Swenson compiled 36 assists, 11 digs and three service aces.The Gophers proved to be too much for the Wildcats in the first set, winning 25-17.Seliger-Swenson started off the set with two consecutive aces, with Minnesota going on a 3-0 run. However, Northwestern came up with a 3-0 run of their own to tie up the match early. Minnesota broke away in the set with an 8-2 run, taking the set shortly thereafter.Wilhite had six kills followed by junior middle blocker Molly Lohman with four and Hannah Tapp with three.Minnesota took the second set 25-21, which was a set of runs by both teams. “I thought we did a good job at stopping their runs before they really got started,” Wilhite said. “Not letting them get more than a few points before we did.” The two squads traded points from the outset of the set, culminating in a 10-7 Northwestern lead. Three consecutive kills and two blocks from senior middle blocker Hannah Tapp led to the resurgence of the Minnesota offense, leading them on a 7-0 run. Northwestern then tied the set up at 15-15, fresh off of a 5-1 run. Minnesota had the last laugh and the last run, capping off an 8-3 run with an ace from Seliger-Swenson. Hannah Tapp had seven kills on the set, leading all players. Wilhite and freshman outside hitter Alexis Hart each had three kills while Wilhite and Seliger-Swenson each picked up six digs.Minnesota completed the sweep in the third set, winning 25-17.The beginning of the set was back and forth, reaching a score of 13-11.Hannah Tapp again sparked the Minnesota offense with two straight kills, leading her team on a 7-2 run. The Gophers closed out the set with a Wilhite kill and a Northwestern hitting error.Hannah Tapp was the catalyst for the Gophers against Northwestern, seemingly having an answer for every single Wildcat run. She was second in the match with 13 kills, but also had a match-high five blocks. She was there at every point when Minnesota needed her, breaking up key Wildcat runs in the second and third set.“It’s always nice to play at home regardless of what has come before,” said head coach Hugh McCutcheon. “We try to get a little bit better every match and play Gopher Volleyball, and I thought we did that today.”last_img read more

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Changes to council ­surveillance powers

first_imgLocal authorities will soon face severe restrictions on their powers to undertake surveillance of citizens under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA). In January 2011, the Home Office published its long-awaited Review of Counter-terrorism and Security Powers (the January 2011 review). Amid all the headlines and controversy about control orders for suspected terrorists, it was easy to miss a number of proposed changes to local authority surveillance powers. The changes will be given legislative force through amendments to RIPA via secondary legislation and the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. From 1 November, the grounds upon which local authorities can authorise directed surveillance under RIPA will be restricted. At present they can authorise such surveillance, under section 28(3)(b), where it is necessary ‘for the purpose of preventing or detecting crime or preventing disorder’. Surveillance is often used to investigate a benefit fraud or to gather evidence of anti-social behaviour. Typical methods include covertly following people, taking photographs of them and using hidden cameras to record their movements. The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Directed Surveillance and Covert Human Intelligence Sources) (Amendment) Order 2012, SI 2012/1500 (the 2012 order), was made on 11 June. It amends the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Directed Surveillance and Covert Human Intelligence Sources) Order 2010, SI 2010/521 (the 2010 order), which prescribes which officers within a public authority have the power to grant authorisation to carry out directed surveillance and the grounds, under section 28(3) of RIPA, upon which authorisation can be granted. From 1 November, authorising officers may not approve directed surveillance unless it is for the purpose of preventing or detecting a criminal offence and it meets the condition set out in new article 7A(3)(a) or (b) of the 2010 order. Those conditions are that the criminal offence which is sought to be prevented or detected is punishable, whether on summary conviction or on indictment, by a maximum term of at least six months’ imprisonment, or would constitute an offence under sections 146, 147 or 147A of the Licensing Act 2003 or section 7 of the Children and Young Persons Act 1933. The latter are all offences involving the sale of tobacco and alcohol to underage children. Introducing a six-month imprisonment test will ensure that directed surveillance is no longer an option when local authorities are investigating ‘minor offences’ such as dog fouling and littering, but there is an exception to the general rule. Because of the importance of directed surveillance in corroborating investigations into underage sales of alcohol and tobacco, the test will not apply in these cases. The 2012 order also removes the second limb of section 28(3)(b) (‘preventing disorder’). Directed surveillance for the purposes of tackling antisocial behaviour will no longer be able to be authorised, unless of course the behaviour constitutes a criminal offence carrying a maximum prison term of six months or more. This will have an immediate impact on the work of local authority antisocial behaviour units. However, the government’s new ­proposals set out in the antisocial behaviour white paper will, once ­enacted, bring some disorder offences (breaches of certain orders) within the remit of RIPA. The Draft Communications Data bill was also published recently. The bill provides an updated framework for ensuring the availability of communications data and its acquisition by public authorities. The most controversial aspects of the bill will enact proposals, announced in the Queen’s speech in May, which will require internet firms to give the police, Serious Organised Crime Agency, intelligence agencies and HM Revenue & Customs access to a wider range of communications data on demand and, in some cases, in real time. The Home Office said that it is updating the law ‘in terms of social media and new devices’. It said that without action there is a growing risk that crimes enabled by email and the internet will go undetected and unpunished. However, civil liberties groups, and internet service providers (ISPs) have voiced concerns about the bill from a privacy and technical perspective. I have discussed these concerns in detail on my Bigger Brother blog. The bill will replace part 1 of chapter 2 of RIPA. Sections 21 to 25 of RIPA (and the related order) currently sets out who can access what types of communications data and for what purposes. This includes the police and security services as well as councils, government departments and various quangos. RIPA restricts access to the different types of communications data depending on the nature of the body requesting it and the reason for doing so. The definition of ‘communications data’ includes information relating to the use of a communications service (such as telephone, internet and postal service), but does not include the contents of the communication itself. Such data is broadly split into three categories: ‘traffic data’, such as where a communication was made from, to whom and when; ‘service data’, such as the use made of the service by any person, for example itemised telephone records; and ‘subscriber data’, such as any other information that is held or obtained by an operator on a person it provides a service to. Some public bodies already get access to all types of communications data, such as the police, security service, ambulance service and HMRC. Local authorities are restricted to subscriber and service-use data, and even then only where it is necessary for the purpose of preventing or detecting crime or preventing disorder. At present, access to communications data is done on a system of self-authorisation. There are forms to complete (signed by a senior officer) and tests of necessity and proportionality to satisfy. Notices have to be served on the service provider requesting the data. The new bill will broadly replicate the current system for accessing communications data by local authorities. There is no provision to widen the scope of the information available to councils or the grounds for doing so (unlike the police and law enforcement agencies mentioned above). However, the bill does replicate the changes to the local authority RIPA regime, to be made by the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. In future, all authorisations for access to communications data, however minor, will have to be approved by a magistrate. The bill also implements another recommendation in the January 2011 review. This stated that the range of non-RIPA legislative frameworks by which communications data can in principle be acquired from ISPs ‘should be streamlined to ensure that, as far as possible, RIPA is the only mechanism by which communications data can be acquired’. Clause 24 introduces schedule 2 to the bill, which repeals certain general information powers so far as they enable public authorities to secure the disclosure by a telecommunications operator of communications data ­without the consent of the operator. This includes powers under the Trade Descriptions Act 1968, Environmental Protection Act 1990, Social Security Administration Act 1992 and the Enterprise Act 2002. Local authority officers in environmental health, trading standards and benefit fraud departments, who may not be have been using RIPA to gain access to communications data previously, will now need to get to grips with a new regime. The forthcoming changes to the local authority RIPA regime will have a big impact on investigation and enforcement activities. Now is the time to review RIPA processes and procedures and to make staff aware of the changing legal landscape. Another recommendation of the January 2011 review will be implemented via the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, which received royal assent on 1 May. The RIPA provisions in this act are yet to come into force, but when they do they will require local authorities to have all their RIPA surveillance authorisations (that is, use of directed surveillance and covert human intelligence sources, and the acquisition of communications data) approved by a magistrate before they take effect. Magistrate approvalcenter_img Communications data Ibrahim Hasan is solicitor and director of Act Now Training. He is also on Twitterlast_img read more

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Legality of ECCC in question

first_img– Ansa McAl pulls plug on T20 sponsorshipTHE legality of the East Coast Cricket Committee (ECCC) has now been brought into question, after Ansa McAl Trading, through its Carib Beer brand, pulled the plug on the committee’s T20 competition. A close source from Ansa McAl has indicated to Chronicle Sport that the decision steamed from the ongoing battle between the ECCC and the East Coast Cricket Board.(ECCB)Over the years the ECCC has pretended to be the legal authority for cricket along the East Coast corridor, a perception which never gained the support of majority of clubs and cricket enthusiasts.According to the source, while the beverage company remains committed to the development of sport, they would not get involved in the wrangling between the ECCC and ECCB.However, from information obtained, the ECCB is the legally constituted organisation and the only authorised body to administer cricket between Abary and Cummings Lodge, hence members and affiliates of the ECCB are further advised that the ECCC is a nasty attempt to hijack the operations of the ECCB.Meanwhile, information reaching Chronicle Sport, yesterday afternoon, indicated that the tournament will go ahead as planned, and has now been dubbed the Bargin Supermarket T20. Set to bowl off today at various venues on the East Coast corridor, the tournament will see the participation of 18 teams.The competition will be played on a knockout format, with one team drawing the bye from the second round.The champion team will receive $200 000, runners-up $75 000 and third-placers $50 000. All the cash prizes would be supplemented by trophies, while several individual awards are also at stake.In the opening round, Better Hope-A will play Mahaica Cavaliers, Strathavon will face Mahaica Sports Club, Golden Achievers will match skills with Bee Hive, Anthony XI will take on Enterprise-A, Better Hope-B and Enterprise-B will clash, Enmore will oppose Ogle, Lusignan-B will come against Helena Sports Club, LBI and Paradise will do battle and Fairfield will face Lusignan-A.Matches will be played every Sunday, with some venues hosting two matches per day, starting at 09:30hrs and 13:30hrs.The final is tentatively set for a Sunday in June.last_img read more

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Rays’ Tyler Glasnow admits he was tipping pitches in ALDS Game 5

first_imgRays starter Tyler Glasnow gave the Astros an advantage they didn’t need in Game 5 of the American League Division Series. He was tipping his pitches.Houston scored three runs before Tampa Bay recorded an out in the first inning, and after Jose Altuve drove in a run with a single, he clearly looked to the dugout and was trying to communicate something. The Astros are notorious for figuring out what pitchers are doing and taking advantage of it. In the 2017 World Series, they picked up something in Yu Darvish’s delivery and lit him up in two starts including a Game 7 win.And for what it’s worth, free agent Trevor Plouffe suggested he knew all of Glasnow’s pitches after one inning in spring training. So it does seem like this has been a problem for the pitcher in the past.”I had his pitches this Spring Training,” Plouffe wrote on Twitter. “Every one of em and it only took an inning.”I had his pitches this Spring Training. Every one of em and it only took an inning. https://t.co/AmZ9cNuuPS— Trevor Plouffe (@trevorplouffe) October 10, 2019 A few minutes later after Alex Bregman doubled and scored on a Yuli Gurriel single, he was seen telling Carlos Correa something in the on-deck circle.It’s unclear if Altuve saw something in Glasnow’s delivery or if Bregman caught something in the signals at second base, but clearly the Astros were tuned into what the righty was doing. Related News And Glasnow confirmed he was tipping his pitches after the game saying it was “pretty obvious” what he was doing.#Rays Glasnow said after looking at video it was “pretty obvious” he was tipping his fastball but #Astros still deserve credit for hitting it— Marc Topkin (@TBTimes_Rays) October 11, 2019Houston tallied four hits before recording an out in the game and lit up a man who held the Astros scoreless through four innings in Game 1. Was Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw tipping pitches in NLDS Game 2?last_img read more

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Turkish midfielder Arda Turan says: ‘Right now I am a Barcelona player’

first_imgArda Turan has spoken about the contractual situation he currently finds himself in: “Now I am a Barcelona player per the contract. It was a mutual decision. I wanted to continue my contract with Barça.  “I think the start of that period of success is the Copa del Rey we won at the Santiago Bernabeu against Real Madrid. The cycle started there.”  Roma not allowed to travel to Sevilla for Europa League game IN SPORT.ES Upd. on 23/03/2020 at 11:48 CET Asked about his biggest success in the game, he turned to 2014: “It was an exceptional success for me. We won a league at Atletico against Ronaldo’s Real Madrid and Messi’s Barça. It was an amazing season. We also won five or six trophies in Europe.  11/03/2020 Turan had his loan with İstanbul Başakşehir terminated in January. center_img Arda Turan: ”Ahora mismo soy jugador del Barça” On the best players he’s played with, the Turkish midfielder was clear: “It’s not necessary to say anything more on Messi. He’s the best I have seen. I also admire Iniesta, for his skills on the pitch.”  SPORT.ES Turan also praised his ex-Atletico Madrid teammate Koke: “He’s an important player. He managed to break into the Atletico side and he’s become a leader. His growth has impressed me.”  “I will probably continue playing with a foreign team next season, away from Turkey, but if Galatasaray call me, I am ready to join them regardless of the conditions. Galatasaray is the only club I wouldn’t give conditions to.”   RELATED STORIESlast_img read more

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