Now streaming: Alaska Native and First Nations films during online festival

first_imgAlaska Native Arts & Culture | Arts & Culture | Community | SpiritNow streaming: Alaska Native and First Nations films during online festivalSeptember 12, 2020 by Pablo Arauz Peña, KTOO Share:Vision Maker Media’s First Indigenous Online Film Festival is showcasing three films focused on stories about Alaska Native and First Nations history. The films are part of the festival’s history and environment showcase and are available to watch for a limited time.Director Christopher Waats’daa Auchter preserves a special moment in the Haida’s recent past with his short documentary “Now Is The Time.”Auchter brings the viewer back to a day in 1969 when a totem pole was raised in the village of Old Masset on Haida Gwaii, just south of the Alaska panhandle. It was the first time a totem pole had been raised there in almost a century after a decades-long ban on First Nations art and culture.Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter’s “Now Is the Time” tells the story of internationally renowned Haida carver Robert Davidson who was 22 years old, when he committed to carving the first new totem pole in Old Massett in almost a century. Auchter revisits August 1969, when the entire village gathered to celebrate the event that would signal the rebirth of the Haida spirit.Auchter weaves archival footage with interviews of community elders who were there that day and with the totem pole’s carvers, Robert and Reg Davidson. In one scene, Auchter uses animation to bring Haida art and language to life.“Imagine your world without art,” Auchter says in the film. “Now imagine if you were the one to help bring it back.”Auchter says he was inspired by Barbara Wilson, a community leader who helped bring the National Film Board of Canada to produce a film from the original footage in 1969.But Wilson was pushed out of the post-production process and didn’t see the film for another 50 years. Auchter says when she finally did see it, she wasn’t happy with the end result.So he took up the task of directing the new documentary.“I didn’t know about this story going into it and going ‘oh wow, this happened.’ and then every time I dug into the story a little more, it just became clear that it was such a pivotal moment in our recent history,” Auchter said.When the totem pole is finally raised, Haida people celebrate with dancing a potlatch. And Auchter says the totem is still there today.“Yes it is. It’s in marvelous shape,” he said. “I think it puts other 50-year-olds to shame. It looks so good.”Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter’s “Now Is the Time,” weaves animation, interviews, and original footage shot by what was then known as the NFB’s Indian Film Crew to tell the story of a totem pole and what it means to the village of Old Masset on Haida Gwaii.“Now Is The Time” is one of three films focused in and around Alaska showcased in Vision Maker’s First Indigenous Online Film Festival this week.The others go back a little further in history in a two-part documentary mini-series titled “A Kayak To Carry Us: Lived Knowledge” and “Stories in Stone” about preserving Alutiiq Sugpiaq culture.Directed by Mark Blaine and produced by Torsten Kjellstrand, the films take place on Kodiak Island, where Sven Haakanson Jr. grew up.“I have a responsibility to make sure that we are able to share this knowledge with communities by bringing it home and giving the knowledge back to our community so that they can have a living context.”Haakanson is a curator at Burke Museum in Seattle. He’s interviewed in both films about his efforts to preserve the past on Kodiak Island.In “Lived Knowledge,” Haakanson shares his perspective of building a traditional Alutiiq kayak.“What do you learn from building a boat? Well you learn patience, you learn that your assumptions are probably wrong and you gain a deep respect for the people that were actually making these boats,” he said.In “Stories in Stone” he shows what it takes to document the 7,500-year-old petroglyphs carved in the rocks near the village of Akhiok. The ancient carvings are being eroded because of rising sea levels and increasingly strong storms.And while both documentaries are centered on the old, Haakanson says he also learned something new during one of his visits to Akhiok.One day, while he was pecking on the rocks where the petroglyphs are carved, a seal popped out of the water.“I was sitting there pecking and it’s like, ‘oh, my goodness, a seal!’ Like I didn’t think anything of it. And then all of a sudden, it popped up even closer is like “Oh!” And so I tested it out, you know, tested it out again, but at the end of the week and it was like, ‘Wow, that actually worked.’”All three films are available to watch for free on Vision Maker’s First Indigenous Online Film Festival page until September 14.Share this story:last_img read more

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Punta Gorda City Council passes ordinance for sign standards

first_imgAdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments AdvertisementHirsh clarified he was not encouraging the inappropriate signs. “Just as much as any other parent or grandparent I don’t like seeing obscenities on a t-shirt or on a sign in a public place. But as a long time defender of the first amendment I know you cannot legislate against it,” he said.City attorney David Levin also commented on the decision. FPL working with Punta Gorda to launch electric charging station pilot program June 16, 2021 PUNTA GORDA, Fla.– Hanging controversial flags in Punta Gorda could now cost you. The City Council unanimously approved an ordinance for sign standards. This means flags and signs with curse words or discriminatory images or language will now be policed.“In America you can’t make that illegal,” first amendment advocate Michael Hirsh said.Hirsh is a longtime defender of the first amendment. He said a change to the sign ordinance in Punta Gorda is not constitutional. He feels the Council is prohibiting signs with disparaging messages directed to the president.“As in f*** Trump or f*** Biden,” he explained. Punta Gorda man gets 16 years in prison for selling drugs June 14, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS Punta Gorda walking bridge destroyed by suspected drunk driver June 9, 2021 Advertisement Punta Gorda ordinance bans bad words on signs, clothing & more June 15, 2021 AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments AdvertisementTags: first amendmentPunta Gorda “Our definition of sign includes thing and if that thing displays language that is indecent as we’ve defined it and is legible to people within a public right of way that would include the potential of someone under the age of 17 viewing it, that would be a prohibited sign,” Levin said.Officials said they’re not planning to police flags.“If staff receives a complaint regarding such type of sign or flag, it would be addressed on a case by case basis, regardless of when the sign or flag was placed on/at the property,” Lisa Hannon said, a Punta Gorda zoning official.Charlotte County does not have a similar proposal or ordinance in place now. However, the Charlotte county commission did ask Punta Gorda to send over their ordinance once approved. Advertisementlast_img read more

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Football memories with O’Dempsey’s and Laois great John Costello

first_img John Costello (main pic) with his former Laois colleague Pat Brophy; bottom left – a photo of John in his playing days; top left – the O’Dempsey’s team that won the championship in 1980 With O’Dempsey’s in the Laois SFC final this Sunday for the first time in 35 years, well wishes are flooding in to the club from all corners.The Killenard area is bedecked in their blue and gold colours – as evidenced at their ‘Tea with the Team’ event last Saturday morning and in the magnificent atmosphere at the local Killenard NS school when we visited on Tuesday.Messages of support have been coming in from all over the world – and we spoke to former club player Dan Culleton who will be following the game on Sunday from Perth. We are also hearing that supporters like Philip Costello is coming home from Boston from the game and Daragh Meredith, whose brother Conor is captain, is flying home from Kuwait, where he is currently teaching.Ahead of the game, we caught up with one of O’Dempsey’s greatest players of all time – John Costello. Big John, who now lives in Andalucia in Spain, has the distinction of playing with club, county, province and country. He lost a senior final with O’Dempsey’s in 1977 before winning it 1980 and. was on the National League winning team with Laois in 1986. He also played for Leinster in the Railway Cup and with Ireland against Australia in the Compromise Rules in 1984.We were in contact with John this week and as well as answering our questions, he also had wanted to mention a couple of people specifically.“I want to wish Mick Kehoe a speedy recovery. He is 86 years old and in not good health. He trained us back in 1980 when we won the championship. And also a mention to all the deceased members of our club especially Terry Behan who was on that team in 1980 and to Martin Slevin who passed away way too young. Also to our club president Dick Slevin who died this year and to my old Laois colleague Pat Brophy who died this year also.”The O’Dempsey’s man is a regular commenter on LaoisToday stories on Facebook – and only last week put up an inspirational video wishing the club good luck. Pinterest WhatsApp Five Laois monuments to receive almost €200,000 in government funding Community Do you remember your first time playing with Laois?My first time to play for Laois was 1977 with Laois U-21  Dublin knocked us out of the Leinster Championship semi finals.  My biggest memory was by far Laois v Dublin NFL semi finals 1978 Croke Park. My partner was the man himself Bobby Miller (RIP) –  a legend. It was also my first time ever in Croke Park as a spec-tator or player. It’s still bedded in my memory.Who were the main influences on your career?The main influence on my career by far was Liam Finlay from O’Dempsey’s. He used to stop at my house in his VW Beatle and insist on me coming up to play football. Thanks Liam.What players did you look up to growing up?My favourite players growing up was Bobby Miller and Dermot Early (RIP).Who would you regard as the best Laois player ever?Tom Prendergast was outstanding to watch on his day.What is your favourite moment with Laois?My favourite moment was winning the League in 1986.What was the low point?My lowest point playing for Laois by far was Aughrim 86 – I’ll say no more. The ref was brutal.If you could go back and do things differently, what would you do?If I could turn back time and do it all again I wouldn’t have drank so much and I would have traveled more.Who were the best players you played with and against?The best player I’ve played with and against by far was the great Matt Connor – his records testified to that. We played in Chicago together.What’s your view of Gaelic football at the moment?My view on Gaelic football today is it’s all professional but name. One player is earning 150,000 per year from sponsorships – it’s only a matter of time.  And the training is savage. Life is short –  live it.I haven’t been to a match in years I don’t enjoy all the hand passing and pussyfooting of the modern game. I’m now living in Spain. I get my results from LaoisToday and Midlands Radio 3.SEE ALSO – Leinster Final Memory: Rising Offaly get the better of Laois in 1981 Do you remember your first and last games with the club? Home Sport GAA Football memories with O’Dempsey’s and Laois great John Costello SportGAAGaelic Football Twitter Pinterest My first and earliest days playing with O’Dempsey’s I must have been 19 because I never played minor. My neighbor and friend Liam Finlay used to collect me in a Black VW Beatle – that started me on my journey. Thanks Liam. I cannot remember exactly when I got my first game because I was rejected on many occasions when I taught I would be picked. But it’s an ill wind as the saying goes. One of the best players started courting so he was going missing – and bingo I got my chance, never to relinquish it. I think a little rejection is good because it makes you want them to eat their words.My last game of any importance was against Ballylinan a league game. I remember going for a ball and suddenly all I could see was blackness and stars and my heart was racing. That was the beginning of my heart problems – Atrial Fibrillation was diagnosed and to this day I’m having problems. That was 22 years ago and that finished me playing.What are your memories of losing the final in 1977 to St Joseph’s?My memories of 1977  final is that we should have won it. We were in control of the game and out of nothing Leo Brennan got the most sneaky goal that won the game for St Joseph’s. Joseph’s were a brilliant team – backed up by the Brennan, Dempsey, Lacey, Campion families and an array of great players, Paddy Doogue in particular. Football memories with O’Dempsey’s and Laois great John Costello TAGS1980John CostelloLaois SFC 2018O’Dempsey’sO’Dempsey’s v Portlaoise By Steven Miller – 11th October 2018 center_img WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR What’s your memories of the 1980 final and the celebrations? Community What’s your earliest football memory?My earliest football memory was Dublin v Laois in the early 70s in Tullamore. Bobby Miller and Brian Nerney were midfield. I was about 16 or 17. Arthur my brother was in Ballyfin College with Brian Nerney and he asked me to go over with him.I thought Bobby Miller was outstanding. I said to my brother I would love to play midfield someday with Laois. Never in my wildest dreams did I think it would happen. I had never played football with O’Dempsey’s before that I never played minor. Facebook Twitter Facebook Previous articleLaois campaigners launch their support for incumbent Michael D HigginsNext articleTwo Laois authors set to launch books at upcoming Leaves Festival Steven Millerhttp://www.laoistoday.ieSteven Miller is owner and managing editor of LaoisToday.ie. From Laois, Steven studied Journalism in DCU and has 14 years experience in the media, almost 10 of those in an editorial role. Husband of Emily, father of William and Lillian, he’s happiest when he’s telling stories or kicking a point. Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ 1980 is and always will be my most memorable with my club O’Dempsey’s. Graiguecullen were our opponents and another great team of that era. Unfortunately they never won the championship but nearly did on this occasion. A fantastic array of individual stars at the time Willie Brennan, Danny Doogue, Pascal Doran, Mick Fennell, Ollie Hand and of course Gary Hearns.I remember the game was going down to the wire and Garry kneed me on my thigh and boom a blood vessell burst and my leg ballooned and I had to be assisted of the field.Brian my brother came to my assistances and was very angry. I was on the sidelines only minutes when Brian got a ball out of nowhere and bang, bang, thank you man – the goal that made history. Thanks brother! My exit was the winning of that game.A marquee was erected beside the Thatch and the celebration is still talked about to this day. Hopefully Sunday can put that win to bed and a new championship win can be talked about for a new generation of players. Council New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official openinglast_img read more

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Laois take step closer to Joe McDonagh Cup final with Antrim win

first_img WhatsApp Laois take step closer to Joe McDonagh Cup final with Antrim win Facebook By Alan Hartnett – 18th May 2019 Facebook Previous articleDeath occurs of well-known and popular local taxi driverNext articleLaois senior camogie lose out on Leinster final place to Offaly Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results GAA Home Sport GAA Laois take step closer to Joe McDonagh Cup final with Antrim win SportGAAHurlingLaois Senior Hurling Team GAA GAA Paddy Purcell Laois 2-24 Antrim 1-19Joe McDonagh Cup Round 2Eddie Brennan’s Laois hurlers are a step closer to reaching the Joe McDonagh Cup final after defeating Antrim in O’Moore Park this afternoon.A strong first half was crucial for Laois as they built up a lead that they could maintain in the second half to see out a very important win.Keeper Enda Rowland was Laois’s main man as he hit three long range frees and saved a first half penalty – which proved crucial.With games against Kerry and Westmeath, who destroyed Offaly today, to come. Laois sit at the top of the table.Laois had the breeze in the first half and they used very well – scoring two goals to take a ten point lead by half time.Paddy Purcell got their first goal in the opening ten minutes after a long puck-out from Enda Rowland was fielded by the captain on the edge of the square.Laois were very dominant in the opening half with Mark Kavanagh, Cha Dwyer, Jack Kelly and keeper Rowland all getting in on the scoring act.Antrim struggled and relied on Ryan McCambridge and Neil McManus for scores but they were given a lifeline at the midpoint of the half when referee Patrick Murphy harsly adjudged Padraig Delaney to have fouled McManus in the area.The veteran midfielder stepped up but his penalty was brilliantly saved by Rowland with Laois going straight down the other end as Cha Dwyer ended their lead.Antrim responded with a Keelan Molloy point but Laois soon had the ball in the net again when captain Paddy Purcell turned provider this time for Willie Dunphy who smashed the sliotar to the net.Antrim ended the half with points from McCambridge and Ciaran Clarke but a late Mark Kavanagh point put Laois ahead by 2-13 to 0-9 at half.Aaron Dunphy and keeper Enda Rowland extended Laois’s lead on the resumption of play and although McCambridge responded for Antrim, Laois went 12 clear with a Kavanagh free.McManus and Keelan Molloy (2) hit back for Antrim but Rowland’s third put 11 between them as we entered the closing 20 minutes.Ryan McCambridge and Ciaran Clarke pointed for Antrim but Mark Kavanagh’s sixth point left it 2-19 to 0-15 after 55 minutes.Cha Dwyer and Stephen Bergin extended the lead but an Antrim goal after 60 minutes from a Neil McManus from a 21 metre free made things closer for the final stages.But any chance Antrim had evaporated five minutes from the end when Ryan McCambridge was shown a second yellow card.Laois saw out the win and now sit safely at the top of the table before their next game against Kerry in three weeks.SCORERS – LAOIS: Mark Kavanagh 0-7 (four frees, two 65s), Paddy Purcell 1-0, Enda Rowland 0-3 (all frees), Willie Dunphy 1-0, Cha Dwyer 0-5, Jack Kelly 0-2, Ross King 0-1, John Lennon 0-1, Aaron Dunphy 0-2, Matthew Whelan 0-1, Stephen Bergin 0-1, Conor Phelan 0-1 ANTRIM: Neil McManus 1-3 (two frees), James McNaughton 0-3 (three frees), Paddy Burke 0-1, Ryan McCambridge 0-4, Keelan Molloy 0-3, Ciaran Clarke 0-2, David Kearney 0-1, Eoin O’Neill 0-2LAOIS: Enda Rowland (St Lazerian’s Abbeyleix); Donnacha Hartnett (Mountmellick), Matthew Whelan (Borris-Kilcotton), Joe Phelan (Camross); Padraig Delaney (The Harps), Ryan Mullaney (Castletown), Lee Cleere (Clough-Ballacolla); John Lennon (Rosenallis), Jack Kelly (Rathdowney-Errill); Cha Dwyer (Ballinakill), Willie Dunphy (Clough-Ballacolla), Paddy Purcell (Rathdowney-Errill); Mark Kavanagh (Rathdowney-Errill), Eanna Lyons (Ballyfin), Ross King (Rathdowney-Errill). Subs: Aaron Dunphy (Borris-Kilcotton) for Lyons (26), Conor Phelan (Castletown) for Lennon (45), Stephen Bergin (Clough-Ballacolla) for Delaney (48), Eoin Gaughan (Camross) for King (58), Eric Killeen (Rathdowney-Errill) for Cleere (63)ANTRIM: Ryan Elliott; Stephen Rooney, John Dillon, Phelim Duffin; Paddy Burke, Conor Boyd, Matthew Donnelly; Neil McManus, Nicky McKeague; James McNaughton, Ryan McCambridge, Keelan Molloy; Ciaran Clarke, Conor McCann, Eoin O’Neill. Subs: David Kearney for Donnelly and Nigel Elliott for McKeague (both ht)Referee: Patrick Murphy (Carlow)SEE ALSO – Row erupts between Fine Gael Local Election candidates over posters Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory TAGSJoe McDonagh CupLaois v Antrim 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

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Prestigious award for Bloom HQ in Mountrath

first_img Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results Twitter Bloom HQ, a community and economic hub located in the Old Convent in Mountrath, are celebrating their prize of Special Winner in the Creative Place Initiative category at the IPB Insurance Pride of Place Awards held at the weekend.The award was received by Martin Meade, Eddie Phelan, Andrea Deering, Samantha Hayes, Joey Hearns, Ed Dunne and Gina Reidy.The community of Mountrath clearly impressed the judges and demonstrated how Mountrath Community Forum have transformed the Old Convent in Mountrath into a vibrant community and economic hub.Cohesive Community effort transformed an 1809 dis-used convent, renovated by locals, into an expressive, colourful, high tech workspace.Imaginative planning created work, training, wellness and community facilities on site and the symbiotic relationship between them breeds long term sustainability. Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Home News Community Prestigious award for Bloom HQ in Mountrath NewsCommunity Facebook Prestigious award for Bloom HQ in Mountrath TAGSBloom HQMountrathPride of Place GAA Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory center_img Dubbed the ‘Oscars of the Community Sector’ the Pride of Place awards are an annual competition organised by Co-operation Ireland and sponsored by IPB Insurance.It promotes and celebrates the best in community development and recognises the selfless efforts of people in making their local neighbourhoods better places to live, work and socialise.This Community Group is to be commended for continuing to work together to increase people’s pride in where they live and in turn help to build the vibrant community we see in Mountrath.The Gala Awards Ceremony was attended by Chief Executive of Laois County Council John Mulholland; the Cathaoirleach was represented on the night by Cllr. James Kelly, Carmel McNicholl SEO Laois County Council and representatives from Mountrath Community Forum.SEE ALSO – Exciting new era as Bloom HQ is officially opened in Mountrath WhatsApp By LaoisToday Reporter – 2nd December 2019 GAA GAA 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleMidlands League glory for Knockbeg Junior BasketballersNext articleIn Pictures: Scoil Chríost Rí celebrate school’s success at golden jubilee LaoisToday Reporter Pinterestlast_img read more

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Edmonton rep fined $75,000 for off-book dealings

Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Mouth mechanic turned market manipulator Between 2008 and September 2011, six clients invested roughly $6,000,000 in AAR. All of the transactions were done off-book and none of AAR’s securities were held in any of the clients RGMP accounts. As well, AAR did not make any filings with the Alberta Securities Commission for private placements. Then in September 2011, Lee arranged a short-term loan for $100,000 from two clients to AAR. The clients were repaid within one week. Again, Lee did not disclose his part in the transaction to his firm. In another instance, Lee arranged an off-book equity investment for three clients in Castle Rock Research Corp. an Alberta-based textbook company. One client invested $350,000 in the company while two others, who had leant money to AAR, invested $850,000. Lee also invested a million dollars in the company from his personal RGMP account. Castle Rock went bankrupt in February 2012. Finally, Lee borrowed $100,000 from a client, who was also invested in AAR, for the purpose of investing in a wine fund. As in the previous cases, Lee did not inform RGMP of his dealings with this client. In addition to the fine, Lee most also pay $5,000 in costs and is prohibited from registering in any capacity for six months. Lee has not worked for RGMP since October 2011. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media BFI investors plead for firm’s sale Keywords EnforcementCompanies Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada Related news PwC alleges deleted emails, unusual transactions in Bridging Finance case Former registered representative Gabriel Ka Leung Lee of Edmonton has been fined $75,000 by the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada for failing to inform his advisory firm of off-the-book dealings with clients between 2008 and 2011. According to the settlement agreement, in May 2008 Lee arranged a meeting between several of his high net worth clients at Edmonton branch of Richardson GMP Ltd. (RGMP) and a representative from a Hong Kong-based company called Asia Active Resources Ltd. (AAR) with the intention of arranging investments in the company. read more

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Re-engaging Volunteers and COVID-19

first_imgRe-engaging Volunteers and COVID-19 A long recovery journey ahead for hard hit volunteering sectorVolunteering Australia data shows volunteering is not snapping back, even as COVID restrictions lift, with nearly three-quarters of survey respondents saying their volunteer programs were not fully operational. During the height of the COVID pandemic in 2020, two out of three volunteers stopped volunteering, equating to an estimated loss of 12.2 million hours per week.Links:Media release.Re-engaging Volunteers and COVID-19 Report.Reinvigorating Volunteering Campaign.Volunteering Australia’s ‘Re-engaging Volunteers and COVID-19’ survey, received nearly 600 responses over December 2020 and January 2021, highlighting some worrying statistics. Although COVID restrictions have eased considerably across Australia, over half of the 600 respondents surveyed, said their organisations needed more volunteers, with four out of ten finding it difficult to re-engage or recruit volunteers. These results are particularly concerning, as recent Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) data shows that pre-COVID, the rate of Australians volunteering and the time they give, continue to decline. In 2019, 7% less Australians volunteered for an organisation compared to 2010 and their contribution was 143 million less hours compared to 2014 (a 20% decrease). Volunteering Australia CEO Mark Pearce said this survey provides evidence of how the volunteering sector is still struggling with the impact of COVID-19.“The next steps are for Governments, at all levels, to engage with the volunteering sector, to find ways to make volunteering easier and more accessible for time-poor or vulnerable Australians. It is vital for all of us to work together and take a holistic approach to support Australia’s diverse and invaluable volunteers. I’m calling on policymakers to commit to partnering with the volunteering sector to reinvigorate volunteering.”This research is part of Volunteering Australia’s Reinvigorating Volunteering Campaign. As part of this campaign, we have set out proposals for how the Australian Government can invest in a Reinvigorating Volunteering Action Plan and a whole of Government National Volunteering Strategy. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, Australian Government, campaign, covid-19, Government, Impact, Loss, Media, pandemic, research, statistics, survey, Volunteering WA, Western Australialast_img read more

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CMA issues final decision on water price controls

first_imgCMA issues final decision on water price controls In December 2019, Ofwat published its price controls setting out the total amount water companies can charge for services in 2020-25. In March 2020, Anglian, Bristol, Northumbrian and Yorkshire asked the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to redetermine their price controls.The CMA’s role is set out by law and requires it to appoint an independent Special Reference Group to conduct a redetermination of the price controls. The Group has to promote the interests of consumers, consider the long-term resilience of water infrastructure, and ensure financeability of the water companies. This means the Group must provide the 4 water companies with enough money for them to cover their current running costs and pay for improvements for the future, including by providing investors with a reasonable rate of return.In coming to its conclusion, the independent Group examined all of the evidence provided by Ofwat, the water companies and a range of third parties, including new information that was not available to Ofwat when it made its decision in December 2019. The Group consulted widely throughout the process, including through the publication of provisional findings and working papers.The Group considers that its determination will allow sufficient investment to ensure bill payers receive a sustainable quality of service.The Group has:adopted the same basic methodology as Ofwatset a headline rate of return to investors of 3.2%, compared with 4.67% in the previous price control period, approximately 3.6% proposed by the water companies and 2.96% proposed by Ofwatprovided increased allowances to pay for improvements in some priority areas such as security of supply and leakagemaintained strong incentives on the companies to improve cost efficiency and service qualityplaced the companies on a stronger footing by reducing their exposure to future costs that may be beyond their controlThe return to investors will be 32% lower than the last price control period, 9% lower than the Group’s provisional findings and approximately 12% lower than the rate proposed by the water companies. Although Ofwat had proposed an even lower headline return to investors, it was also proposing to increase revenues for 3 out of 4 of the companies by bringing forward revenue from future price control periods, and to pass this charge to bill-payers; the Group has reversed this adjustment.The Group considers that the return set out in its determination is the minimum that is sufficient to allow the companies to finance their activities and invest in long-term infrastructure. On the basis of the most up-to-date evidence, the Group has also concluded the companies will together need to spend more than Ofwat had estimated to carry out essential operations – but if the companies do not spend all of this extra cost allowance on providing services, customers will get more than half of this money back.As a result of this determination, customers will be spending, on average, £34 less per year on their bills than they were paying in 2019/20. This is a smaller reduction than was proposed by Ofwat, but bills will be slightly lower than set out in the CMA’s provisional findings, in September 2020.Kip Meek, the Chair of the Group, said:In coming to our decision, we have sought to balance keeping bills low with the need to maintain a good quality of service and to invest in critical infrastructure for the future. Our decision means that customers of these companies will be paying, on average, £34 less per year for their water than they did in 2019/20.F /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:efficiency, exposure, finance, future, Government, infrastructure, Investment, law, money, quality, resilience, revenue, running, security, spending, sustainable, UK, UK Government, Waterlast_img read more

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Drink Victorian Program backs local brewers & bars

first_imgDrink Victorian Program backs local brewers & bars The Victorian Government is getting behind Victoria’s brewers, winemakers and distillers with a new program aimed at getting more locally produced drinks into bars and restaurants.Minister for Agriculture and Regional Development Mary-Anne Thomas announced on Wednesday $1.5 million of funding for the Drink Victorian Program at the official opening of the Australian Craft Beer Centre of Excellence in Ballarat.The Victorian Drinks Alliance – a collaboration between Victorian beverage producers and Food and Drink Victoria – developed the program to build domestic demand for locally produced drinks, in response to the challenges faced during the pandemic.Initially targeting 100 hospitality and retail venues across metropolitan Melbourne, the Drink Victorian pilot program will lead regional visits, host Melbourne-based ‘super tastings’, deliver training and offer marketing support to encourage venues to include more Victorian-produced drinks on their menus.The program has been funded by the government through the recently launched Food to Market program and the Small Scale and Craft program, with additional support from Global Victoria.The Food to Market grant program is one of the key initiatives being rolled out as part of the government’s transformative Agriculture Strategy, demonstrating a commitment to supporting small-scale and craft businesses.The newly opened Australian Craft Beer Centre of Excellence builds on a rapidly growing interest in brewing beer. The Centre includes a craft brewery, a beer tasting and bar area, teaching space and a function area.Working closely with Federation University in Ballarat, the Centre’s “brew space” will provide an opportunity for small brewers to hone their craft and to also receive advice on how to develop their businesses.The Centre, which has been supported by the Victorian Government’s Regional Tourism and Infrastructure Fund, will create more than 25 new jobs and cater for a broad range of visitors. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Australian, Ballarat, Global Victoria, Government, infrastructure, market, Melbourne, Minister, pandemic, regional development, space, super, tourism, university, Victorialast_img read more

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From the SVC: Investing in a culture that’s ready to innovate

first_img Published: Oct. 24, 2017 This past Tuesday, as I sat in the audience for the chancellor’s State of the Campus speech, I felt such a sense of excitement about the Be Boulder Pact announcement. First and foremost, it is spot-on regarding putting our students at the heart of every decision we make. Senior Vice Chancellor and CFO Kelly FoxPersonally, I am thrilled by how it demonstrates what we can do when we are willing to step back and look at how the university works; what we can accomplish when we work across unit lines and are prepared to test out new ideas and new ways of doing business.The ideas behind the Be Boulder Pact came from people willing to change the status quo at CU Boulder, to challenge the “way we’ve always done it.” In my column last month, I talked about the investments our campus leadership is making in organizational resiliency and responsiveness. I can already see the results of these investments—from the willingness to reinvent how we handle course and program fees to the full funding of the CU Boulder Impact Scholarship.As the next step in my commitment to foster these growing collaborations and creative collisions, at the beginning of November I am convening the first all-staff gathering of Enrollment Management, Finance and Business Strategy, Human Resources, Infrastructure and Safety, Office of Information Technology, and Strategic Relations and Communications.I am looking forward to this opportunity to challenge and support all of these units as we reimagine how we do our work. We will discuss how we can stay centered on the core mission of our university and bring results-oriented and inventive ideas to the table. I am committed to facilitating a culture shift from “I have to solve this on my own” to “we’re in this together.”I will continue to support small wins and big changes and actively lay down the foundation for the next century of success at CU Boulder. I encourage all of our campus community to do the same; engage in creating our future, whether by participating in visioning like Academic Futures or a campus challenge like the “short experiment” innovation grants or more. Everyone’s ideas, creativity and input are needed and welcomed.Thank you,Kelly Fox Senior Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial OfficerCategories:Leadership CornerCampus Community Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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