sport shorts

first_imgThe Middletown South Do Damage Baseball and Do Damage Softball camps that take place in July are taking registration for youngsters ages 6-15.Do Damage Baseball Camp has two segments from 9 a.m. to noon on July 8-11 and on July 15-18 under Middletown High School South baseball coach Ryan Spillane and his staff.The Do Damage Softball Camp takes place from 9 a.m. to noon on July 8-11 under Middletown South softball coach Tom Erbig and his staff.Current and former players now competing in college are on both staffs, which will teach the fundamentals of the respective sports.For more information, visit the programs’ websites at dodamagebaseballcamp.com and dodamagesoftballcamp.com.last_img

Read More

Seven clubs ready for POMRFL qualifiers

first_imgThey’re Brothers, Souths, Royals, Paga Panthers, Defence, Kone Storms and West.The teams are well into training camp and have been undergoing intense training at their suburbs.All games for all three divisions will be played this Sunday (15 Nov) at the Murray Barracks oval.In the women’s qualifiers, Royals will take on Panthers and this winner will play Souths who are standing by for the grand final.The U19 qualifiers will see Defence battle with West while Brothers will take on Panthers. Winners of both matches will advance to the grand final.Brothers will once again fight for a grand final spot in the A grade games when they take on Souths followed by the main game between Royals and Kone Storms.POMRFL is expecting a big turnout as the competition nears grand final.last_img

Read More

It is time!

first_imgDear Editor,In my letter to the Guyanese media, dated August 13, 2018, and captioned as “The time is now for the GTU to act”, I mentioned the fact that President’s David Granger’s Government can easily find G$1 billion annually to travel internationally but cannot find the same amount of money for teachers.  Such funds can easily increase each teacher’s salary by some $7900 per month.  Now, I am reading that the Granger Government did not enter these negotiations with the GTU for the teachers alone but for all public servants. Isn’t that against the spirit of collective bargaining? Any labour union leader will advise that collective bargaining is done between an employer and a union for the members of that union, not every worker because the process was designed to empower the trade unions. Am I to believe that the People’s National Congress (PNC) is up to its same old ways where today they plan to infiltrate and dis-empower these trade unions.That is what the Education Minister said in a Ministry of the Presidency press release and I shall quote “I would want to ensure that what we offer to teachers is what we can afford but also what we’re going to offer to other categories (of workers).”This is a plain old game of political subterfuge and deception at conning the teachers out of bread by commingling their negotiations with the entire public service.  Such wicked political acts create the occasion and cause for a national teacher strike.If nothing else, the actions of the Granger Government is gross “eye pass” and disrespectful to the services of the teachers.  After all, they mould the minds of the nation’s most valuable asset – its future; its children which is very different from what other public servants do. It is a totally different deliverable and must be treated differently.Luckily, there are still opportunities to correct this injustice conceived and perpetuated by Granger’s Government; all he has to do is think constructively for all of Guyana rather than remain so focused on self-preservation.First off, Granger must familiarise himself with a budget created in his name, he must not remain so aloft from the process.  With the right knowledge, I am sure he will instruct areas for cutting some fat and make the entire system more effective and efficient.One thing he can call for is an impact and outcome audit of the last three budgets to evaluate what has the people gotten for him taxing them, borrowing in their name and then spending some $900 billion.Such an exercise will expose what a public circus we have under Granger and how he can find the money to immediately pay the teacher $5000 per month on top of what they are currently making. That would-be money spent that is worth its weight in gold compared to what is happening today – overseas trips, parades, and bodyguards.As an example, let us reflect on the Prime Minister’s Secretariat, which is not even a Ministry but a Department in the Ministry of the Presidency.  In 2017, it spent some $882 million but what did it achieve for the people? This Department delivered less work over three years than its predecessor did in even three months.  Isn’t time to cut all the pageantry, sirens and public waste that is happening in places like the Prime Minister’s Secretariat and pay the hardworking teachers a living wage?Then there is the food bill for the National Parliament? Come on now, $700,000 per sitting? Then there is the Public Telecommunications Ministry? Guyana after three years is yet to benefit from the sort of advances made in the world in this sector even after spending some GY$6.5 billion in this sector under Minister Cathy Hughes since she took the job.Again, this Ministry under Hughes is set to spend some GY$4.6 billion in 2018. Where is the progress? Where are the deliverables?The Office of the Auditor General has asked for payment voucher valued at billions of dollars in unaccounted expenditure on that parade ground at D’Urban Park, but the PNC are sand-dancing on the issue in full compliance to their historical DNA. But yet Clive Thomas and his State Assets Recovery Agency is in a dead asleep on this issue. The hypocrisy is off the charts and the collateral damage for such public theft sufferation to the entire teaching profession and some people are starved so that some people can have their parades, sirens, and international trips.I call on all teachers to come out and support the strike again this injustice being meted out to them in 2018.Sincerely,Sasenarine Singhlast_img read more

Read More

CONFIRMED: Charlton Athletic sack manager Russell Slade

first_imgCharlton have parted company with manager Russell Slade after just 16 matches in charge, the League One club has announced.Slade was appointed on June 6, signing a three-year-deal, but with the Addicks 15th in the table and six points off the play-off places, the 56-year-old has been relieved of his duties.A statement from Charlton confirming the sacking read: “The club has reluctantly made this decision after results this season, which have left the team occupying 15th place.“The club wants to give itself the best possible opportunity of achieving its number one priority – winning promotion to the Sky Bet Championship at the earliest opportunity.“The club would like to thank Russell for his tireless work during his time at The Valley, particularly the processes and disciplines he has instilled at the training ground, and wishes him well for the future.“The club will make no further comment until a new manager has been appointed.”Northern Irishman Chris O’Loughlin, who has coached in Congo and Belgium, has been linked with the job. Russell Slade has been sacked after just six months at The Valley 1last_img read more

Read More

Colin Hendry plays down possibility of Celtic setting league record

first_img no dice REVEALED REPLY 2 Former Rangers defender Hendry believes Celtic’s trophy success over the recent history has been diminished because of the absence of Rangers.Hendry told the Heart and Hand podcast: “It shouldn’t really be but I don’t think it was helped by the period where Rangers weren’t in the Premiership. Hendry won the domestic treble with Rangers in 1999 BEST OF Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card REVEALED LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury ADVICE center_img 2 huge blow Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Rangers won nine in a row between 1989 and 1997, matching Celtic’s previous record between 1966 and 1974.The Ibrox club were refused entry to what was then the SPL after the club went into liquidation in 2012 and were subsequently demoted.It took them four seasons to win their way back to the top flight. Scott Brown lifts Celtic’s seventh consecutive league title Getty Colin Hendry says if Celtic were to win 10 Scottish Premiership titles in a row it would be devalued because of Rangers’ absence.The Hoops are closing in on their eighth consecutive league title and will be just two away from claiming the record. Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ shining Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars “Everybody suffered. Celtic suffered because they didn’t have an Old Firm game to play and irrespective of them achieving what they are going to achieve, it’s not fully achieved because Rangers weren’t there for several years.“So you can argue it until the cows come home but the fact is that Rangers were not in that league when they did win so they are talking about their treble trebles or their nine and ten-in-a-row, to all of us outside of Celtic it’s not really what it is.”last_img read more

Read More

Donegal Garda gets ban and suspended jail sentence after crashing into Garda car

first_imgA serving Donegal Garda has been banned from driving for six years and given a five month suspended jail sentence after pleading guilty to drink-driving.Kevin McLaughlin aged 31, appeared at Carrickmacross District Court in Co Monaghan where he pleaded to a number of charges. These included drink driving and also dangerous driving on March, 20th, 2015.McLaughlin, with addresses at Gartan, Churchill, Letterkenny and 30 Woodvale, Carrickmacross had pleaded guilty to the charges.The court had heard that Mr McLaughlin, who was a serving Garda based in the area, was driving his own car which crashed into a Garda vehicle that was stopped on the roadside at Moyles outside Monaghan town.Two gardai at the scene were injured – one seriously.McLaughlin was arrested and found to have reading of 290 milligrams of alcohol in his blood.In relation to the second drunken driving charge, the prosecution said the serving Garda was intercepted as he drove from the Garda Station at Carrickmacross on August 16th, 2015.He was again found to have an alcohol level above the legal limit.Defence Counsel said McLaughlin had service of eight years in the Gardaí and had previously completed three years with the Defence Forces.He accepted he had a problem with alcohol but had since sought help – he also apologised profusely for what happened.Passing sentence Judge Denis McLoughlin said the court could not ignore the “elephant in the room” and that Mr McLaughlin was a serving member of An Garda Siochana.He sentenced him to five months in jail but suspended it for two years for drinking driving and took a charge of dangerous driving into consideration for the offences on March 21st, 2015.On a charge of drink driving on August 16th, 2015, he disqualified him from driving for six years.Donegal Garda gets ban and suspended jail sentence after crashing into Garda car was last modified: February 24th, 2017 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More

Speaking at Local Events vs. National Conferences

first_imgMy husband tells me to get over it. I continue to be surprised by people who reply to me they’re “too busy” to speak at local events or Meetup groups. However, they find time to travel out of state to speak at regional and national conferences.What am I missing?As an event and conference planner for the past seven years for local groups including:Michigan UXPARefresh DetroitMetro Detroit WordPress MeetupWordCamp Detroit 2011 and 2012Detroit User ExperienceInternet User ExperienceHighEdWeb MichiganI’ve been very fortunate to have people in our area accept my invitations to speak at events and conferences. It’s been wonderful to hear their presentations, panels, and workshops. Lately, I’ve noticed several people who have told me they’re too busy to speak at local events are traveling out of state to speak at national events. Which puzzled me. Wouldn’t it be easier to speak locally, where you don’t have to travel, and where you can connect and network with people in your community? Local events are a great place to start speaking, or to test out that presentation you’re giving at a national conference. So I asked some of my friends, including speakers who have spoken at events I’ve organized: What am I not understanding?My friend Misty Mills, who organizes a lot of events, said she didn’t understand it either. It makes more sense to me to make local networking connections and help those in your area than having to leave the state for ‘bigger’ opportunities where you‘re just one of many. While I would speak at a regional/national conference if I was asked, I have also done many local groups and things. I love local stuff.Chris Wiegman, who spoke remotely to our Metro Detroit WordPress group last fall, said he’s surprised at how often it happens. Seems they’re just looking to be part of the ‘cool kids’ who often think themselves above local groups. So sad.Chris is a big believer in supporting and speaking at local events. In a local community, having folks who avoid the community in order to speak solely at more ‘prestigious’ events goes against the whole concept of the community they claim to support. The bigger community may be great, but not at the expense of the locals who are just as important, if not more so.David Brooks, who has graciously spoken at our Refresh Detroit meetups whenever he’s in Michigan, commented he’s seen the trend toward people speaking nationally, and not locally. He’s noticed that attendance for meetups with national speakers is high, but that good presentations on similar topics by people nearby are ignored.Drink tea with the locals, says Dino Baskovic, who also spoke at our Refresh Detroit group. Best advice I ever followed. Dino remarked he personally gets more value out of his local groups. He commented it’s possible companies pressure people to talk nationally rather than locally. David Lingholm, another Refresh Detroit speaker, said that in the local social space, it’s challenging to get respect without a national following. I loved his comment about building and recognizing our local community of talented people:For tech to thrive here, we need to do better job of recognizing talent in our own backyard and nurturing it.So, I ask you, have you noticed the trend for people to speak at national conferences instead of local events? What would make you choose to speak at a national conference instead of a local event? Share your thoughts in the comments. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…Relatedlast_img read more

Read More

Building a Truly Collaborative Enterprise

first_imgOpinions expressed herein are my own and do not reflect that of my employer, Intel Corporation. My other posts can be read here and more about me is available on my website. The benefits of having a highly collaborative enterprise is a given.  It’s not just the positive impact on business results like reduced time to market of products, their quality and improved customer satisfaction; the benefits also translates to better knowledge and people retention, workforce motivation and cohesiveness of the overall organization.  On the other hand, the challenges to ingrain the culture of collaboration within the organization are equally large, if not more.The fundamental level of collaboration does happen in all enterprise.  People share content, files, e-mails, ideas, apps and whatever else is necessary to get the work done.  I call this collaboration by necessity.  This includes demonstration of collaborative behavior when ‘collaboration’ is mandated by the senior management.  Collaboration by choice is when people will proactively start on any task with a collaborative mindset in absence of any mandate, necessity or to fulfill any obligation.  When thinking of creating a collaborative organization start with people centric approach instead of tools and technology.  Don’t be afraid to review and revamp the holy cows of annual performance reviews, rewards & recognitions and career promotions.  Identify the key areas where you would like to see more collaboration and remove any hurdles – process, workflow, budget and tools – that would be a hindrance.  Define a balanced scorecard that would give you an indication of the progress and not just motion.Tools and TechnologyAsk any IT manager or a technologist about how to improve collaboration within the organization, they will come up with a list of tools and technologies that should be deployed that will guarantee improved collaboration.  A fancy looking dashboard will show how many groups have been created, documents and other content shared, comments posted, adoption rate and other indicators that, collectively, are expected to show how much of collaboration is happening within the organization.As someone once said, “Do not confuse motion with progress.  A rocking horse keeps moving but does not make much progress”. The indicators and dashboard have to be developed that reflect the impact on business results.  Have we accelerated the design, development or some other process?  Has the day-1 quality of our product improved?  In order to track return on investment the dashboard has to include hard data that shows a clear and direct impact to business results; e.g. number of support calls dropped by 50% with new product launch compared to previous product launch.Processes and WorkflowIn most cases, when an organization selects tools and technologies for enabling collaboration they compare feature and functions.  In fact, I would go on a limb and say that there never is any mapping done to see if the selected tools will adapt to the processes and workflow of the organization.  It is usually assumed that management mandate, training and change management will encourage users to adapt to the tools instead of the other way around.This assumption works only if the management is also willing to do away with the processes that are a hurdle to frictionless collaboration.  If the processes and workflow are not in sync with the tools, the extra burden of adapting to these tools will erode productivity of the workforce. Yes, there will be some productivity loss during the ramp up phase but in steady state, the collaboration tools and the organization processes should be in sync to be frictionless. People and IncentivesWhile tools, technologies and processes enable or facilitate collaboration it is the people who actually collaborate.  Unfortunately, this fact usually comes as an after-thought to most of the organizational leaders.  On more than one occasion I have read and heard about the typical management chutzpah where they announce restructuring, cutbacks and layoffs on one hand as they ‘encourage’ the organization to become more collaborative and share knowledge on the other!The other irony I see is that in most of the knowledge based industry, where collaboration is of paramount importance and can clearly create a differentiator, the incentives are stacked against it.  Individual performance is rewarded more than the team performance.  Deep expertise is touted more than collaborative results. Teams are scattered around the globe without any globalization strategy in place that is conducive to collaboration. Travel budgets are cut assuming that video conferencing can replace face-to-face highly interactive discussions and team building.  In short, the human and humane aspect is ignored with a faulty assumption that technology can bridge the gap.Increasing collaboration within the organization is about culture shift, management & leadership and people empowerment supplemented with tools and technologies.  The strategy should be thought out at the highest possible level of the organization instead of driving it bottoms up.This shift in mindset and behavior of the organization is complex and requires focused attention from the management.  It cannot happen overnight and, if ignored, will revert back to non-collaborative behavior very rapidly.It can be done and rewards are all worth the effort!last_img read more

Read More

Got just a single observation? New journal will publish it

first_imgAbout 8 years ago, when he was a postdoctoral researcher, cell biologist Lawrence Rajendran was applying for a job when a colleague predicted that, if he could get two papers he had co-authored published by Science, “you’re sure to get the position.”As it turned out, the colleague was right. The journal accepted both papers and Rajendran, 40, who grew up poor in rural India, got the job. He now heads a laboratory at the University of Zürich in Switzerland and has won awards for his research on Alzheimer’s disease.But the colleague’s comment long troubled him, Rajendran says, because he felt it overemphasized “the label on my papers” from a prestigious journal. His concerns about scientific publishing grew as he studied several flawed papers that had been yanked from high-profile journals. Certain figures from those retracted manuscripts were subsequently published elsewhere, he discovered.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Those experiences made Rajendran wonder: Was the pressure to publish tempting authors to improperly tweak their findings in order to create more cohesive stories? If researchers could report just the one finding they felt comfortable with, Rajendran mused, perhaps “there would be no need to be dishonest.”Those ponderings eventually spurred the creation of Matters. Launched on 5 November, the open-access online journal aims to boost integrity and speed the communication of science by allowing researchers to publish discrete observations rather than complete stories.“Observations, not stories, are the pillars of good science,” the journal’s editors write on Matters’ website. “Today’s journals however, favor story-telling over observations, and congruency over complexity … Moreover, incentives associated with publishing in high-impact journals lead to loss of scientifically and ethically sound observations that do not fit the storyline, and in some unfortunate cases also to fraudulence.”“We want to reward scientists for honesty, curiosity and the quality of their work—not just good storytelling,” Rajendran says.Some scientists, however, worry Matters could exacerbate another problem: the long-standing practice of slicing a large body of findings into many manuscripts, in order to boost authorship numbers. “There is already a great abundance of fragmented stories being published, driven [in] large part by the misconception that the number of papers is a metric of success,” says cell biologist Peter Walter of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Matters could amplify this trend, he says, “while vastly increasing the burden on the community by asking us to review individual experiments.”Misaligned incentives?The debate over Matters reflects a larger, ongoing discussion over incentive systems in science, and the role of storytelling in scientific communication.John Ioannidis, a Stanford University epidemiologist in Palo Alto, California, sits on Matters’ scientific advisory board. Trained in statistics and medicine, Ioannidis is widely known for pioneering the field of “meta-research,” which examines how science is conducted and reported. One issue meta-researchers are exploring is misaligned incentives.To advance their careers, researchers need to publish results, and those that support a compelling narrative have a greater chance of success. This is because scientists and journal reviewers, like most human beings, enjoy game-changing stories with “plot, structure, logic, drama and where hopefully the good prevails,” Ioannidis wrote in an email to ScienceInsider.“Good,” particularly for high-impact journals, generally means novel, positive results from several lines of investigation that converge on a single hypothesis. Yet things rarely unfold this way. Research is hard, and biology is complex. Clean narratives tend to mislead by oversimplifying complicated phenomena, Ioannidis says. “Researchers are forced to build stories that are often speculative fairy tales.”Because good stories are more satisfying than ones with false starts and loose ends, “we are incentivized to make our stories more beautiful than reality,” notes Brian Nosek, a social psychologist at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, who also directs the Center for Open Science.The push for new, compelling stories carries additional dangers. It discourages publication of work that merely replicates prior experiments. And it prods researchers to discount discrepant findings. Let’s say a student or postdoc tries to replicate a reported result in order to decide whether to pursue a new line of investigation. If the results fail to reproduce the original finding, the researcher faces a dilemma.There are few, if any, places to publish one-off experiments that aren’t part of a bigger story but might still be informative. So unless the researcher “invests in a series of additional experiments to package the failed reproduction, that result will languish in laboratory notebooks,” says biomedical ethicist Jonathan Kimmelman of McGill University in Montreal, Canada. “This makes it impossible for outside scientists to assess the totality of evidence when judging the reliability of a research claim.”Paid peer reviewersMatters aims to address such problems by making it easier to publish bits and pieces of science. It aims to create a freely accessible venue for single findings, even confirmatory data and contradictory data.  The journal series is currently accepting submissions in cell biology, biochemistry, biophysics, neuroscience, and genetics.The first 500 submissions will be free. After that, Matters will charge $150 per submission from universities and other nonprofit groups, and $300 per submission from for-profit entities. Half of these funds will go to editors and reviewers or, if they wish, to a charitable organization. (Collabra, an open-access journal launched in January, also pays its peer reviewers.)Researchers can submit quickly—typically in under an hour—using Matters’ online template that combines Word and Photoshop features. Submissions are evaluated in a triple-blind process of peer review.Observations judged to be technically sound (i.e. scoring above 4 on a 1 to 10 scale) will be published in Matters within two weeks of submission. Outstanding findings that score 8 or above in technical quality, novelty, and impact will be published in a sister journal, Mattersselect.Will stories emerge?Despite the emphasis on discrete observations, Matters’ founders believe good stories could still emerge from the fragments. The journal will enable reports on related observations—by the originating authors or others—to be linked, so researchers could build narratives from collections of published observations. And tools that allow scientists to visualize such networks could provide new metrics for success. Rather than being judged by their number of publications or by the impact factor of the journals in which they publish, researchers could be assessed by “how good a ‘seeder’ or ‘extender’ they are,” says Rajendran, who put in $160,000 of his own savings to help launch Matters.Rajendran hopes Matters can also help level the playing field for researchers in poorer areas, who may lack resources such as antibodies and mouse models, “but can still make good observations.” For example, he says, consider a researcher who is able to show, with proper controls and statistics, that an extract from eucalyptus bark relieves pain under certain conditions. “In today’s world, you can’t publish that in a good journal,” Rajendran says. “You would need to know which molecule it is and whether it cured the population of Nigeria.”However, if the “A leads to B” eucalyptus finding were published in Matters, someone else could isolate the molecule, then another lab could test it in mice and eventually human patients. The developing story never eclipses the seeding observation, and “everyone gets a piece of the pie,” Rajendran says.The new journal could also improve the reliability of the published literature by “lowering the activation barrier” for making orphan data accessible to the broader community, Kimmelman says.Doubts and optimismNot everyone buys Matters’ atomistic approach. UCSF’s Walter, for example, would prefer to see researchers place a greater emphasis on “only publishing once it is clear one actually has something profound to say.” He won the Lasker and Shaw prizes in 2014 for his research on the intracellular quality control system known as the “unfolded protein response.”Ioannidis agrees that there is currently “too much salami-slicing of publications into least publishable units on which scientists can claim authorship on seemingly more and more papers.” But he’s cautiously optimistic that outlets like Matters could still help, by allowing researchers to assemble many little bits into a greater, connected entity. The journal may help the scientific community move “in the opposite direction, one of coalescence rather than fragmentation,” Ioannidis says.Nosek believes the reporting of fragmented findings is inevitable because “science is too complicated to have integrated, complete stories from the outset.” Embracing this reality, he and colleagues at the Center for Open Science are creating tools such as SHARE, to help connect findings, studies, protocols, data, and other parts of the research life cycle. SHARE has so far collected more than 3 million research “events” from 76 content providers, and the system’s next phase of development will focus on building services to help researchers search, filter, and link these events.“Scientific communication is undergoing a renaissance,” Nosek says. “There is lots of innovation with new approaches to doing it better. I don’t know which will work, but we can’t know for sure without trying them out.”last_img read more

Read More

Scientist behind CRISPR twins sharply criticized in government probe, loses job

first_img By Dennis NormileJan. 21, 2019 , 2:30 PM Scientist behind CRISPR twins sharply criticized in government probe, loses job I am glad to see that the Chinese authorities plan to punish He for his transgressions and that they plan to follow up to monitor the medical status of the children. The preliminary findings from an investigation by Guangdong province, released today through Xinhua, China’s government-run news agency, mostly confirm previous suspicions. According to Xinhua, investigators have determined that He gathered funding and set up a research team at a lab outside his university. The researcher recruited volunteers among couples in which only the husband was HIV positive. Under normal practices, such couples are not eligible for in vitro fertilization treatments in China, Xinhua reported, so He went so far as to have noninfected individuals stand in for blood tests.News of He’s work surfaced on the eve of the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong, China, in late November 2018. At a special conference session, He defended his work and revealed that a second woman was pregnant. The Xinhua report did not mention the current health status of the baby girls or of the expecting mother, but did say all are under medical observation.Xinhua reported that He’s work “violated ethical principles and scientific integrity and breached relevant regulations,” and that He and associated persons and institutions “will receive punishment according to laws and regulations.” According to news reports, He’s movements have been restricted since he returned to Shenzhen, with guards outside his apartment on the university campus, but he has communicated with colleagues. He Jiankui (center) during a Q&A after his presentation at a meeting in Hong Kong, China, on 28 November 2018. He Jiankui, the Chinese researcher who claimed to have edited the genomes of twin baby girls in a heritable way—and earned widespread condemnation for conducting a risky procedure with little potential benefit—deliberately sidestepped regulations, dodged oversight, and used fake ethical review documents in hopes of gaining “personal fame” for a worldwide first, according to preliminary results from a Chinese governmental investigation reported today.In response to the news, the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen, China, announced it was rescinding He’s contract as an associate professor and terminating his teaching and research activities, effective immediately.In November 2018, He claimed to have engineered the genomes of early embryos to give the girls and their descendants resistance to HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The dubious achievement, which He described at a scientific meeting and in YouTube videos in the wake of media reports, relied on CRISPR, a genome-editing technique that has never before been used on human embryos that were then implanted. He’s experiment was swiftly condemned by researchers and ethicists within China and around the world who insisted that safe, effective ways already exist to prevent HIV infection. What’s more, many questions still remain about the CRISPR technology and the potential for it to accidentally cause unwanted, dangerous changes.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) David Baltimore, California Institute of Technology Imaginechina via AP Images “The incident is a serious violation of national laws, regulations and ethical guidelines,” China’s National Health Commission in Beijing said in a statement posted on its website today. The country’s Ministry of Science and Technology pledged to “work with relevant departments to jointly improve relevant laws and regulations and improve the scientific research ethics review system.”“The picture that we get is that He carried out an organized effort to circumvent all regulations and be the first to produce a gene-edited child,” says biologist David Baltimore of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, who helped organize the Hong Kong meeting and has sharply criticized He’s work. “I am glad to see that the Chinese authorities plan to punish He for his transgressions and that they plan to follow up to monitor the medical status of the children.”But the news report leaves a host of unanswered questions. It does not specify who conducted the investigation, for instance, or precisely how—or even whether—the genomes of the babies were altered. “I do hope that a more complete report will be issued including relevant data and procedures that were followed,” Baltimore says.With reporting by Jon Cohen.last_img read more

Read More