Hammerson hits high in second half of 2009

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Read More

Partnership to build German H2 stations

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Read More

Petrel, partners accept Ghana acreage offer ‘in principle’

first_imgFollowing years of stalemate Petrel Resources and its partners in the Pan Andean consortium might be on the verge of resolving a dispute over their offshore assets in Ghana.To remind, in 2008 the Pan Andean consortium in which Petrel now holds a 30% stake agreed an exploration licence over block Tano 2A in Ghana, however the agreement has never been ratified the Ghanaian National Petroleum Company as there was a dispute over a part of the block for which the consortium claimed was its acreage.  Pan Andean is a Ghanaian company, owned 60 percent by Clontarf Energy, 30 percent by Petrel, and 10 percent by local Ghanaian interests.Following delays in negotiations, the consortium then launched a court proceeding regarding the issue, which it says it later won.However, the consortium then decided to amicably settle the matter out of court and moved to discontinue the court matter in July 2014, and discussions have been held to amend the area for exploration and production. Also, in a separate development, Ghana invited the consortium to apply for acreage in the deeper part of the Tano basin, which Pan Andean accepted.Negotiations have recently started in relation to the new deep-water Tano Basin acreage as well as replacement acreage for the signed Petroleum Agreement on Tano 2A Block.In a statement on Monday, September 19, Petrel said it was offered revised Tano Basin acreage coordinates by Ghanaian officials, which the partnership accepted in principle.“Negotiations to formalize a revised Petroleum Agreement between the Company and Ghanaian officials will continue as an agreement has yet to be reached on certain matters. The company’s directors look forward to providing shareholders with further updates, including specific geological information relating to the new acreage coordinates, as negotiations progress,” Petrel said.The company has, however, added that no assurances can be given that these negotiations will lead to a successful outcome for the company or that a formal agreement will be reached.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

Read More

The electorate speaks

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

Read More

Air Partner cautious over prospects for current year

first_imgThe company says that this can be attributed to the continued economic uncertainty and the lack of visibility characterising the industry.But the company says planned investment is continuing, bringing into the team experienced professionals with a strong sales focus and industry-wide connections and the board remains confident in the long term growth prospects for Air Partner’s key markets.Chief executive Mark Briffa said revenues from the largest division, commercial jet broking, are currently lower than last year, but in line with the board’s expectations.Sales within the freight broking and private jet broking divisions have been encouraging although it is still too early for this to provide any reliable indication of future financial performance.He also said the group was making progress in its strategic aim of increasing the contribution from operations outside the UK.Mark Briffa, CEO said: “When Air Partner published its annual results, in October, the Board noted that the aviation sector was likely to be affected by continuing instability in the primary world markets. This has proved to be the case, with a number of airline operators and travel companies reporting financial difficulties. Against this backdrop of a very difficult trading environment, Air Partner remains stable and continues to trade profitably.”Our US business continues to show early signs of improvement, as investments made over the last 12 months start to have a positive impact. New general sales agency arrangements and a further strengthening of the sales team have seen Air Partner’s sales presence extended to cover Hungary, Poland and Slovenia, Ukraine, Greece, Cyprus and Switzerland. Discussions are also progressing on the establishment of Air Partner’s services in Asia.last_img read more

Read More

EXG delivers in Dahej

first_imgThe absorber measured 39 m x 4.3 m x 4.3 m, which resulted in an overhang of 10 m on the trailer.EXG had to block traffic at various locations on the 660 km route, travel on the wrong side of the road on the Kasara ghat, and along a single-track road from Songir to Ankleshwar, to deliver the consignment to the project site.Headquartered in Mumbai, EXG is an asset-based company with a fleet of Goldhofer hydraulic axles and cranes with a lifting capacity up to 450 tons (408.2 tonnes). www.expressworld.com  www.wwpc.eu.comlast_img

Read More

Volga Dnepr delivers to Dutch Caribbean

first_imgFour IL76-TD-90VD charter flights departed from Maastricht in the Netherlands, delivering supplies to the islands over the period of one week.The deliveries were brought about by a call from the Ministry of Health, Culture and Sport, Netherlands (VWS) to assist with the islands medical infrastructure.The St Maarten medical centre received two 12.2 m medical ICU units manufactured by Hospitainer. Six 6.1 m units were moved by barge to the smaller island of St Eustatius.Ventilator machines, medicine and essential personal protective equipment (PPE) were also delivered.www.volga-dnepr.comlast_img

Read More

Roundtable: market makers

first_imgA difficult economy combined with far-reaching changes in legal regulation has given the UK’s dominant legal market, England and Wales, the feel of a dramatic landscape heading into 2013. Commentators have taken to reaching for an impressive range of cliches and metaphors – from ‘perfect storm’ to ‘brave new world’, and even referring to ‘shifting tectonic plates’. The air of breathless expectation was such that one almost expected to see a mushroom cloud over the offices of the Solicitors Regulation Authority upon the advent of alternative business structures (ABSs) a year ago. Attendees at the Gazette’s third roundtable discussion included a selection of those whose decisions and actions will likely shape the legal landscape of the future. Simon Allen is national practice group leader at Russell Jones & Walker – now part of stock exchange-listed Australian firm Slater & Gordon. Christina Blacklaws is director of The Co-operative Legal Services, an ABS with the ambition of adding 3,000 lawyers over the next few years. David Jabbari was recently appointed chief executive of support and referral network Connect2Law. Mark Stobbs is the Law Society’s director of legal policy. The Legal Services Board’s chief executive Chris Kenny has oversight of the sector’s frontline regulators. And Bruce Macmillan, senior vice-president, senior commercial legal counsel at Visa Europe, provides the contrasting perspective of a corporate client with an in-house legal team. For the most part, those present do not talk of the hype surrounding changes in the legal market. ‘It sounds a bit gloomy for the high street,’ Blacklaws ventures. ‘But I do think there is hope for businesses that are completely client-focused. We are a large organisation with large organisational costs. Smaller businesses which are able to be fleet of foot and still deliver great local services are in with a chance.’ The pressures on the legal market are, of course, acknowledged. The emergence of ABSs is on that list – but changes to civil litigation are equally prominent. Allen sees widespread consolidation in the PI market resulting from them: ‘At the moment there are multiple firms trying to grab a share of the market, many of them buying cases from claims management companies – and the effect of Jackson is that those smaller firms are going to diminish in number because they will not have the opportunity to buy the work.’ The outcome, he says, will be ‘a number of big players’ between whom ‘the competition will be more aggressive but more purposeful’. Jabbari acknowledges the pressures here, but warns against ‘determinism’. ‘I don’t think we’ll know clearly the way the market is going until three or four years’ time,’ he says, noting that much discussed ‘new’ entrants, such as CLS, the QualitySolicitors franchise, and his own Connect2Law network, ‘will find that their own business models will need to evolve as the market evolves’. Money in? The perception of the legal market being of a fixed size that will be divided among players who increasingly compete on price is a commonly held one. On this view, profit margins will only be maintained by lowering service levels. Instead, Blacklaws argues, the market can, and should, grow – if unmet demand can be unlocked by changes in the legal community’s business practices. ‘There is a huge unmet legal need in this country and we haven’t as a profession found a way of offering services that are attractive to the “squeezed middle” – the coping classes – those who have legal needs and don’t perceive that they can afford legal services,’ she says, adding that fixed and transparent pricing, and better ‘public legal education’, will be central to tapping that larger market. It is a point supported by Kenny, who is critical of the profession’s assumption that the Clementi reforms, culminating in the Legal Services Act 2007, are somehow ‘neoliberal or Thatcherite’. ‘You could,’ he argues, ‘say the reforms are essentially much more egalitarian in intent in making services more responsive and competitive. A third or more of the population don’t address problems that are “legal” because they don’t think they can afford it.’ Jabbari points to the way US internet providers unearthed a ‘secondary market’ that apparently was not there before. At the table were: A growing market Questions on quality Level playing field Allen starts to explore the relationship between quality of service and advice, and what are often labelled the ‘economies of scale’ – a thorny issue for larger providers who make their case under the shadow cast by those volume conveyancers (for example), which have attracted criticism for poor service on low-margin work. Allen insists the issue can play out differently in different areas. ‘Think of a firm,’ he urges, ‘where you have only 100 PI cases a year. It might include problematic disease cases, a brain-injured person, a client with mesothelioma – I’m dubious about a practitioner being able to deal with that range of work.’ His analysis is based in part on having taken over ‘generalist’ practices where he felt mesothelioma clients were being let down. Macmillan draws on parallel experience from the corporate environment. ‘I wouldn’t be happy with someone dealing with only five bits of litigation a year picking up a major case for me,’ he says. ‘And so you carry that thought-process through, and ask what the minimum competent scale is to be doing that work. I want to know that your team are handling the number of files or cases that relate to a specific type of legal activity or area of legal expertise that will ensure you can be a competent, efficient and effective practitioner team at all levels of seniority, in all aspects of that activity or area of expertise.’ To deal with road traffic accidents through the RTA Portal, significant investment in IT systems is needed, Allen notes – again pointing to a minimum ‘scale’ for a practice in some areas. Stobbs highlights the role of insurers and lenders as intermediaries in the legal market, noting ‘it’s worth reflecting on how that is affecting client choice’. That may yet, Kenny believes, be a matter for the Financial Services Authority to investigate. ‘I’d be interested in how the FSA approached that,’ he says. ‘It probably depends on what you think you are buying from the insurer. If you think it is an end-to-end service, which is about the totality of handling your claim, it’s not wrong to say that every little bit of the bundle can be specified by the insurer. But if you’re saying you are buying the end result, that does argue for greater choice for individual elements of it.’ The challenge, he concludes, ‘may well be the insurer who turns around to the client and says “OK, but the cost will be that much greater. I can’t give you the same guarantees about timescale”. And the challenge then for those non-panel lawyers is to communicate how what they offer will be more effective than the “vanilla” service would’.center_img A complicating feature of a more open market is the existence of multiple regulators. There is a risk that each may apply not more suitable regulations and conditions, but instead ones that compete on cost and supervision for the regulated entities and individuals. ‘It’s difficult to see how you can have a level playing field when different regulators are regulating different methods of providing exactly the same services,’ Stobbs says. Blacklaws adds: ‘There are real issues around regulators popping up offering differing regulations for different areas with different hurdles and different standards.’ And, Jabbari weighs in, ‘if there isn’t a convergence of behaviour between the SRA and those regulating the claims management companies, for example, it will cause all sorts of irritation’. ‘The danger of “regulatory arbitrage” is not a new one,’ Kenny ventures. ‘But is it a problem? Theoretically it has to be.’ Responding to that, he makes clear, is a work in progress: ‘The challenge the LSB has got is to make the statute work in a way that allows the regulatory diversity which clearly was the will of parliament to work, while ensuring that firms can’t shop around to find the doziest and cheapest regulator who will give them the easiest ride. You can’t do that. Whether there is scope for more convergence – only time will tell.’ Kenny admits: ‘Right now all regulators need to raise their game to catch up with where the market is. But they almost need to do that individually, before they can begin to talk about shared decision-making or merger.’ For providers of legal services, Macmillan notes, regulatory arbitrage is increasingly providing legitimate choices around qualification, training and development. ‘Do I want to put someone through the trainee lawyership route these days? Or to take them through a paralegal structure towards potential future qualification, that meets their and our professional development needs (in particular providing legal advice in a hands-on way within a business context), but which doesn’t have the same overheads and risks about being committed to an expensive trainee head with little demonstration of practical ability available to us at the time of hiring? Part of the arbitrage is to make sure the regulation of training and qualifications does the job in terms of outcomes (providing competent staff) and isn’t in excess.’ Do demands for consistency and transparency always point to scale alone? Jabbari believes not: ‘Just because one is attached to the traditional independent law firm model, that doesn’t mean you can’t have behind that quite a high level of process and technology.’ That process and technology, however, ‘doesn’t need to be there on the high street’, even if the practice in question is. The challenge posed by Macmillan is for law firms of all sizes to become better at defining their proposition. ‘Show me what features define competent performance in your areas of expertise and then show me what you offer over and above competence,’ he urges. ‘Then I can decide whether and, if so, how much to pay extra for your extra service quality features over and above what I need to pay anyone for competent performance. What the profession tends to do is to blur those distinctions but, in an increasingly commoditised legal services world, this failure to show that the value you add supports your prices merely offers opportunities for new players to make you look too expensive.’ With the prominence given to concerns around the ethics of external investment in advance of ABSs being allowed, the low priority given to raising funds by the vast majority is perhaps a surprise. Blacklaws says it was never a consideration for CLS: ‘I understand why other jurisdictions might be concerned about influence and client interests from external investment. But, while it has many other advantages, we didn’t apply for ABS to bring in external investment.’ For Slater & Gordon, Allen relates, the business listed ‘because it did not want to be owned by an insurance company. Like RJW, the firm didn’t want short-term venture capital coming in – they would be thinking about a return in six months, and what would you do to secure that return?’ He adds: ‘We all wanted client care and services to clients to be delivered well and profitably, to be at the core.’ There is, he notes, a substantial risk to an entity that seeks to create a legal business model that departs from that ‘core’, pointing to the example of those who invested in systems to handle volume RTA claims – only to have their margins drastically reduced by recent reforms to civil justice. The discussion turns to the linked issue of building a ‘brand’. More than one attendee retains doubts about brands that are ostensibly no more than a ‘marketing exercise’. Instead, Jabbari says, a focus on ‘brand’ has much to do with consistent, known service levels – the ability, in a positive sense, to ‘standardise’ a service. ‘The client needs confidence in uniform charging structures and quality,’ he argues; ‘uniform response in terms of communications, that lawyers are operating off a consistent single system’. But beyond that, ‘a degree of diversity is good, and underlines the message that this is a human service’. Finally, there are acknowledged risks for large brands – arguably surmountable, but never absent. For legal services linked to larger consumer brands, Stobbs asks about the impact of having negative associations as a brand for the ‘other side’ in a family case. Kenny also notes: ‘Brand is both powerful and vulnerable. If a legal adviser in Worcester has a bad day, the whole brand is vulnerable.’ ‘We can’t compromise on quality,’ Blacklaws counters. ‘We are a small business within the Co-operative Group, and we could not risk anything that could lead to brand damage. That is an important check and balance within our model.’ She insists the result is a focus on quality service, delivered in a consistent way. ‘It entirely depends on your approach and attitude. In our family law team, we want to help clients to achieve resolution of their problems with the least possible damage to them and their family. If we achieve this, we achieve a “halo effect”. An entire family who are grateful we were part of the solution.’ The message from this group for those concerned that the future of legal services is faceless, systemised and scripted, is that such an approach is not what is currently driving their plans. As Jabbari reflects: ‘There is a higher incidence of mistakes when you move to an entirely process-driven system. It is in the nature of law to always resist out-and-out commodification. I’m sceptical about the argument that we improve quality with a total move to process.’ Chris Kenny, Legal Services Board; Eduardo Reyes, Law Society Gazette; Simon Allen, Russell Jones & Walker; Mark Stobbs, The Law Society; Bruce Macmillan, Visa Europe; Christina Blacklaws, Co-operative Legal Services; David Jabbari, Connect2Law; Catherine Baksi, Gazette Discussion kindly hosted by TLT Solicitors Eduardo Reyes is Gazette features editorlast_img read more

Read More

Toronto airport rail link preferred bidder named

first_imgCANADA: The AirLINX Transit Partners consortium of Aecon Construction & Materials and Dufferin Construction Co was named preferred bidder to design, build and finance Toronto’s Air Rail Link project on October 24.The ARL connecting Terminal 1 at Pearson International Airport with Union Station in the city centre is being procured by Infrastructure Ontario using a PPP model, which the province refers to as ‘alternative financing and procurement’. The infrastructure body is acting on behalf of transport authority Metrolinx, which will own and operate ARL. The project cost will be announced following financial close, which is expected early next year. Construction of a 3 km branch to the airport from the Weston subdivision of GO Transit’s Georgetown corridor is scheduled to begin in ‘spring 2012’, with services to start in time for the Pan/Parapan American Games in July 2015. ARL is predicted to replace 1·2 million car trips in its first year. ‘Connecting Canada’s largest airport to Toronto’s downtown via a comfortable and reliable transportation option is an important service for our airport guests’, said Lloyd McCoomb, President & CEO of Greater Toronto Airports Authority. ‘This is a critical piece of the transportation equation for our region, good for the environment and Ontario’s global competitiveness.’last_img read more

Read More

National Strategy Needed To Tackle Dirty Camping & Rural Crime – Carson

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInGalloway and West Dumfries MSP Finlay Carson has called for a national strategy from the Scottish Government to deal with the scourge of dirty camping that has become the focus of anger in rural communities. The local MSP spoke yesterday in Holyrood in a Members Debate on the problems of dirty camping and irresponsible behaviour in the countryside; Mr Carson -who is the Shadow Minister for Rural Affairs & the Natural Environment- strongly advocated for the restoration of Countryside Ranger services nationally; pointing to the example of Loch Ken in Kirkcudbrightshire where a there has been numerous acts of irresponsible behaviour. The Loch Ken Trust have come together with the Police and Community Safety officers, but recognise more needs to be done. Speaking after the debate, he said: “Responsible access to land is set out under the Land Reform Act 2003, and whilst the overwhelming majority of the public willingly comply with necessity to leave the countryside as they originally found it after wild camping – a noticeable minority have left a trail of destructive behaviour; littering the most beautiful parts of the country, and leaving naturally untouched areas unsafe for visitors and any wild animals.“I welcome the contribution of individuals and local organisations, in Galloway we have successfully managed to pull together funding for 2 Countryside Rangers on the Southern Upland way with the Local Authority and Scottish Power Renewables coming together with a funding package.  But the scale of the problem and the blot it is leaving on the natural environment, local people and the reputation of Scotland’s countryside demands much better from the Scottish Government – it’s high time that a national strategy to tackle dirty camping and associated rural crime was implemented.“A strategy to re-introduce Countryside Rangers would help inform and educate visitors not only improving the visitor experience but assisting in deterring poor and irresponsible behaviour.“There is an issue of  funding, and a lack of long-term investment in rural communities. Scotland’s Ranger Services were, supported by funding managed by SNH. However two fiscal measures were implemented which subsequently impacted on this support, particularly for Local Authorities. Firstly, indirect funding of Local Authorities was stopped which meant SNH could not give grant aid to them. This was, however, mitigated by ring fenced funding for Ranger Services held within the Local Authority block grant. However, a few years ago this ring fenced protection was also removed and that policy has had a significant detrimental effect on Local Authority Ranger Services since.To compound this, SNH, now ‘NatureScot’, made a unilateral decision to phase out grant aid support to Ranger Services out with the Local Authority sector – Affecting NGOs, private estates, charities and community led initiatives and directly lead to more Ranger job losses in this sector too. “I would urge Ministers to come back to Parliament with a considered and proactive plan that can provide reassurance to communities across Scotland that the damage and harm that they have seen on their doorsteps will not continue. ““ I have written to invite the minster to meet with me and stakeholder to explore the way forward in a nationwide effort to bring Countryside Rangers back into our communities.”last_img read more

Read More