Probe of suspected vaccine-narcolepsy link to take months

first_imgSep 23, 2010 (CIDRAP News) – The European Medicine Agency (EMA) said today it is not clear if there is any link between narcolepsy cases and the Pandemrix vaccine for 2009 H1N1 influenza, and it will take 3 to 6 months to investigate the possibility fully.The EMA’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) concluded that further studies are needed, the agency said in a news release. In the meantime, the panel agreed that there is no need to restrict the vaccine’s use, as the benefit-risk balance continues to be positive.The EMA launched a review of Pandemrix on Aug 27, in the wake of reports of narcolepsy in vaccinees, mainly from Sweden and Finland. The vaccine, which is made by GlaxoSmithKline and contains an adjuvant, was administered to 30.8 million Europeans during the H1N1 pandemic.As of Sep 17, there were 81 reports from healthcare professionals suggesting narcolepsy, all collected through spontaneous reporting systems, the EMA said today. These included 34 from Sweden, 30 from Finland, 10 from France, 6 from Norway, and 1 from Portugal. Another 13 “consumer reports” have come from Sweden and 2 from Norway. Patients range from 4 to 52 years old.”The ongoing review is complex and will take some three to six months to complete,” the EMA said. “The Agency is working with experts from across the European Union to carefully scrutinize all available reports. Owing to a potential overlap of narcolepsy symptoms with several other neurological and psychiatric disorders, diagnosis is very often not confirmed until several years after symptom onset.”Recent reports of narcolepsy in children seem to outnumber those in previous years for some countries, but many uncertainties need to be clarified, the EMA said. Earlier diagnoses of narcolepsy might have contributed to the apparent increase, and the H1N1 pandemic itself might have influenced the numbers, the statement said.About 2 weeks ago, Swedish regulators said their own preliminary investigation had shown no link between narcolepsy cases and Pandemrix.On Sep 1 the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it had reviewed information from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System and found no signs of a connection between narcolepsy cases and the H1N1 and seasonal flu vaccines used in the United States, where Pandemrix is not licensed.See also:Sep 23 EMA news releaseSep 9 CIDRAP News story “Sweden finds no link between H1N1 vaccine, narcolepsy”last_img read more

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Developers eye up Dome as Nomura sale collapses

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Air Liquide acquires Cryogas galvanising its Panama presence

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Afrox progresses with ASU in Eastern Cape

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Gases in art wow the crowds

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Estimating the Cost of Flooding Around Estuaries

first_imgThe National Oceanography Centre (NOC) and the University of Liverpool have developed a new visualization tool to predict the maximum cost of coastal flooding to communities around estuaries.This method works by combining high impact flooding scenarios with land use maps. Researchers used this method to find that the economic damage of coastal flooding increased much more than expected with the size of the flood.Combining a model for flood inundation with one that simulates the effect of waves means that it is possible to estimate how likely it is that sea defenses will be ‘over-topped’ in a changing climate. This threshold is based on a plausible amount of sea-level rise by 2100.The highest recorded river level was also added to this model to give an overall ‘worst-case scenario’ of flooding for communities around estuaries.A new tool then relates the model output in terms of how many brick layers the flood water will reach, this can then be easily related to possible mitigation options for the different water levels.The lead author of this study, Thomas Prime, from the University of Liverpool, said: “By showing how high the flood water could rise in terms of brick courses, and providing a corresponding estimate of economic damage, these new maps can help residents see the impact of low probability flooding scenarios.”
An estimate of the economic damage of the flood is obtained by relating the water depth predicted by this method with the land use maps. This information is then fed into ‘depth-damage curves’, which are used to give a value for the economic damage of flooding for a given water depth and land use type. For example, arable land under five meters of water or residential property under three meters.Dr Jenny Brown, co-author of this study from the NOC, said: “This research is an example of the NOC’s commitment to developing transferable science that benefits coastal communities through the provision of evidence in support of flood risk management.
This new visual representation of flood hazard identifies areas at risk, allowing improved adaptive management – increasing community resilience to climate change and rising sea levels. This work leverages the expertise in marine hazards from across NOC, and our external collaborators, to assess flood risk to a coastal community from extreme waves, water levels and projected rises in sea level.”last_img read more

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Protest marchers call the tune on legal aid

first_img Join the Law Society Gazette Legal Aid LinkedIn sub-group. Tomorrow sees the Trades Union Congress ‘March for the Alternative’ rally, taking place in central London. It is predicted that tens of thousands will turn up to protest against the planned public sector spending cuts, in what is expected to be the largest TUC event for decades. The Law Society will be represented, through its Sound Off for Justice campaign, alongside supporters of the Justice For All campaign. They will be protesting against the government’s proposals to reduce legal aid eligibility and scope. Lawyers are not generally known for their militancy. The Gazette reported last month that thousands of French judges and lawyers had taken to the streets to protest against remarks made by president Nicolas Sarkozy, in which he declared a murder suspect ‘presumed guilty’ before trial and criticised ‘lax’ judges. But this is not France. Yet it is indicative of the strength of feeling among legal aid lawyers that so many are expected to give up their Saturday to make their voices heard. And they plan not just to shout and wave banners – but also to sing. A Sound Off For Justice choir who will ‘sound off’ along the route of the demonstration, singing the nation’s favourite protest songs. Have we ever seen the like? People following the campaign on Facebook, can suggest their favourite protest songs for the choir to sing. For one day only, at least it will not be the Ministry of Justice calling the tune.last_img read more

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A wider problem

first_imgThe case of Gary McKinnon and the unpopular US/UK treaty dominated coverage of the extradition review in the mainstream press. So it made a pleasant change to read Joshua Rozenberg’s piece in the Gazette. While I share concerns about the treatment Mr McKinnon might face if extradited, the problems with our extradition laws do not start and end there. I do not agree with everything in the review but it did make some very positive recommendations on the European Arrest Warrant, responsible for over 1,000 extraditions from the UK last year (compared with about 10 a year to the US). If implemented, these would address some serious cases of injustice. Two years ago, for example, our client Andrew Symeou was extradited to Greece where he spent months in one of Europe’s worst prisons awaiting trial. Thankfully, Andrew was cleared when the trial finally started two years later. The review not only called for the EU to work to improve Europe’s detention regimes, but also for a power to delay extradition until the country is trial-ready. This would enable someone like Andrew to wait for trial at home, instead of being sent to languish in a foreign jail. These kinds of proposals lack the drama of ‘wholesale reform’ but they would address some real problems with our extradition laws, while allowing us to retain the kind of effective extradition system we need to tackle cross-border crime. It would be tragic if they were completely obscured by the disappointment of those who had hoped the review would back their calls to tear up the US treaty. Jago Russell, chief executive, Fair Trials International, London EC4last_img read more

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CBS News Special Report – Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg

first_img Author: CBS News Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. (CBS NEWS) CBS News Special Report – Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg The late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Ginsburg, who died last week at the age of 87, is the first woman and the first Jewish person to receive this honor.In 2005, civil rights activist Rosa Parks was lain in honor at the U.S. Capitol. A distinction only ever given to three private citizens. To lie in state is reserved for public officials.The invitation-only arrival ceremony was held in Statuary Hall on Friday. Social-distancing guidelines dictate that the ceremony will only be open to a small number of invited members of Congress and Ginsburg’s family.Watch below or click here. All other members of Congress may then pay their respects.A private interment service will be held at Arlington National Cemetery next week, the Supreme Court said.Ginsburg has been lying in repose at the Supreme Court, where members of the public were invited to pay their respects. Chief Justice John Roberts spoke at a brief private ceremony Wednesday and called Ginsburg’s life “one of the many versions of the American dream.” He said the 483 majority and dissenting opinions she wrote during her 27-year tenure on the Supreme Court will “steer the court for decades.” Published: September 25, 2020 9:10 AM EDT Updated: September 25, 2020 10:59 AM EDT SHARElast_img read more

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Nationwide alarm at EAW opt-out plan

first_imgLegal professions across the UK have united to call for full public consultation on the government’s proposal to opt out of more than 130 EU criminal justice measures, including the European arrest warrant (EAW). The call follows reports that the prime minister David Cameron indicated during a trade visit to Brazil last week that the government intends to exercise its opt-out powers before the end of the year. The Law Societies of England and Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland as well as the Bar Council have warned that the decision will hamper the fight against cross-border crime and threaten law and order in the UK. The government has until the end of May 2014 to notify the European Commission (pictured) of any decision to opt out of all of the police and criminal justice measures adopted under the 1992 Treaty of Maastricht. Law Society of England and Wales president Lucy Scott-Moncrieff said that a decision to remove the UK from so many criminal justice ministers, most of which are procedural and promote practical co-operation between member states in fighting cross-border crime, could have far-reaching implications. She urged the government to engage with practitioners to seek their views in an open and transparent consultation process. Bar chief Michael Todd QC said: ‘Those who advocate an opt out of EU criminal justice measures assume that it will remove the UK from the scope of EU criminal justice, and that it may save money.’ But he said the UK’s opt-out can relate only to measures established before the Treaty of Lisbon came into force in 2009, which would be a ‘recipe for confusion and greater costs’. Todd warned: ‘The loss of these measures, including the EAW, would directly threaten law and order in the UK.’ He said that the practical considerations involved in the fight against cross-border crime would mean that the UK would almost certainly need to seek to opt back into them. Todd said that there is ‘more than enough time’ for a full public consultation to assess the impact of the changes properly and urged the government to do so. Austin Lafferty, president of the Law Society of Scotland, said: ‘A wholesale opt-out could have very serious consequences in fighting cross-border crime from both a practical and cost perspective.’ He warned that even if the UK is able to opt back in to some measures, it would cause ‘confusion, complexity and cost’. He said: ‘This important decision should not be seen as a totemic pro/anti-EU issue. It should be taken on its own merits, based on practical experience and objective information.’ Law Society of Northern Ireland president Imelda McMillan added: ‘Failure of government to consult publicly on this very important decision would be a serious oversight and would raise significant concerns in the legal profession – at home and across Europe.’last_img read more

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